traffic

 

The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) announced today that it will close the Webster Tube on March 14, 2016 for maintenance and graffiti removal.

The Webster Tube, coming into Alameda, will be closed as follows:

The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) announced recently that it will close the Webster Tube on Wednesday, Feb. 24, for inspection and maintenance.

The Webster Tube, coming into Alameda, will be closed from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. the following morning

Cintas Fire Protection will be performing inspections, maintenance, and servicing all emergency fire extinguishers.

Questions or information about the tube closures should be directed to Tony Padilla, Caltrans, Tunnels & Tubes, at (510) 286-0315.

 

The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) announced today that it will close the Posey Tube in late January for cleaning and other maintenance.

The Posey Tube, leaving Alameda, will be closed as follows:

I think that it’s important to get the word out that one of Alameda’s most recognized locations is in danger of being bulldozed and replaced by high-density townhomes and condominiums. I’m talking about the Alameda Marina.
With changes in zoning implemented in 2012, a large part of the waterfront in Alameda that faces the Estuary was re-zoned from “light industrial” to “mixed use.” “Mixed use” allows retail, residential, light industrial and commercial properties. Since around 1965, the Alameda Marina has been a recreational centerpiece of the Northern Waterfront. 

The Park Street Bridge remains completely closed to pedestrians, bicycle and motor vehicles from 8:30 p.m. to 5 a.m., Sunday through Thursday until Thursday, Aug. 13. A detour will rout vehicles over the Fruitvale Bridge.

The closures will also affect vessel traffic on the estuary; large vessels that need both the bridge’s leaves open will be required to provide at least two hours’ advance notice.

Alameda City Planner Andrew Thomas’ letter to the editor (“City planner responds,” April 30) is disingenuous and borders on ludicrous. In a carefully worded statement, Thomas states that the City Council, Planning Board, and Alameda Point Environmental Impact Report (EIR) “did not say” at multiple public hearings “that the redevelopment of Alameda Point would result in only one car.” Far from producing the “Oh, OK then!” reaction he undoubtedly wanted, this declaration simply begs the question: Why not?

With the Fourth of July rapidly approaching, community members should be aware of the many assocated no parking restrictions and street closures due to take effect a week from tomorrow.
No parking restrictions will be in effect starting at 4 a.m. along the parade route. Signs will be in place well in advance to allow motorists to move their vehicles. Any vehicles in violation will be towed and stored by the Alameda Police Department. 

Commuting into and from Alameda over the next decades is bound to take longer, and I think it is “by design” by many government agencies.

The Caltrans project main goal is to improve the 23rd and 29th avenue exits of Interstate 880. As the primary impact is to the Oakland neighborhoods, the project mostly concentrated on appeasing Oakland neighborhood needs. The Alameda County Transportation Commission’s hired a consultant for the five-year project.

Alameda Police Department (APD) Chief Paul Rolleri said he doesn’t know whether it’s gratifying or horrifying that officers in his department wrote 62 tickets in five hours during February’s pedestrian crosswalk sting.

 

For the full story, and more Alameda news, visit http://webh.it/alamedasun.

 

The Planning Board took a first look Monday at a plan intended to blunt the traffic to and from Alameda Point. The Transportation Commission will offer its recommendation on the draft transportation demand management plan on April 23, and the City Council could approve it on May 19.

Read the full story and more Alameda news at http://webh.it/alamedasun.

 

 

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