Planning Board

 

Architect Daniel Hoy is scheduled to appear before the Planning Board next Monday, representing property owners Sam and Michelle Koka. According to a report City Planner Henry Dong submitted the last time the Koka’s project was before the board in November 2016, they propose to build an approximately 14,300-square-foot, three-story, mixed-use building on the southwest corner of Webster Street and Pacific Avenue. 

The Planning Board and the public will have a chance to review and comment on three key elements of Site A at the board’s Monday, Feb. 22 meeting: Block 8, Block 11 and the parks.

Block 8 Plans
Block 8, which contains 128 apartments for low-income families and seniors, would stand on the north side of Ralph Appezzato Memorial Parkway (today’s West Atlantic Avenue). The senior building’s main entrance to senior housing would be immediately across the street from the A-7B Corsair II jet at today’s East Gate. 

Alameda residents will be able to review Master Plans for two Alameda developments for the first time at the Planning Board meeting this Monday, Jan. 25, at City Hall. The Planning Board will review plans for both the Block 10 area within Alameda Point’s Site A project and Encinal Terminals.

 

The City of Alameda Planning Board has recommended that the zoning designation for a site housing a 78,000-square-foot former federal government facility on Central Avenue be amended to create a wellness center for homeless seniors. The recommendation was made at the Monday, Oct. 8, Planning Board meeting.

At its May 29 meeting the Planning Board unanimously approved the Alameda Marina master plan and the adoption of the plan’s Environmental Impact (EIR); the vote was 5-0. Pacific Shops, Inc. owns the property, which consists of 27 acres of land. The City of Alameda owns the 17 acres of waterfront property, which it has leased to Pacific Shops, Inc. The combined properties are located on the north side of Clement Avenue bordered by Willow Street on the east and the Alameda Municipal Power offices on the west. 

 

The city is offering the public a chance to comment on the recently released citywide plan to provide more transportation options for Alamedans at upcoming public hearings in the council chambers.

Residents will have the opportunity to give city officials feedback on the initial draft of the city’s Transportation Choices Plan at the Planning Board Meeting on Sept. 25, at the transportation commission meeting on Sept. 27 and the City Council meeting on Oct. 17.

 

After debate and discussion that stretches back to at least 2012, the city is studying the Universal Design Ordinance’s final draft. The city already has some universal design requirements in place and is now set to shape these requirements into an ordinance. The ordinance aims to ensure equal access to housing for people born with mobility issues and people who develop these issues without significantly impacting housing costs and affordability.

 

At its June 12 meeting, the Planning Board approved an amendment to Catellus Development Corporation’s plan at Alameda Landing. If approved by the City Council, the amendment would allow a total of  700 housing units at the Landing. 

The Planning Board endorsed the proposal, which would add some 300 to 400 homes to those already  in the mix by a 6 to 1 vote. Board  member Ronald Curtis cast the lone dissenting vote. Curtis said that he could not support the plan, citing the traffic increase it would bring.

 

There are three public hearing agenda items regarding new development at Alameda Point at the upcoming Planning Board meeting Monday, Jan. 23 at City Hall.

The Planning Board will consider recommending to the City Council approval of the Main Street Neighborhood (MSN) Specific Plan.

 

Members of the Planning Board are scheduled to discuss the city’s Transit and Transportation Demand Management Plan at their next meeting.  

If approved the plan would focus on implementing four strategies. The first two would address improving travel to and from Oakland and San Francisco, including the commute by BART and ferry. The third strategy would affect getting around Alameda, while the fourth would focus on properly managing and monitoring these collective efforts. 

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