parade

 

The 2016 Alameda Mayor’s Fourth of July Parade is in the books. Winners will receive trophies at an upcoming City Council meeting. This year Rancho el Afortunado took home the Mayor’s Trophy. Riders aboard Rancho el Afortunado’s pure Andalusian horses also won trophies for Equestrian (Charro Class) and Sweepstaker. 

The Alameda Elks won the honors for the best float, followed by 510 Fitness and Kiddy Kampus Cooperative Preschool. 

Other winners were divided into the following categories.  

Vehicles

The LMS Band will be among the musical attractions of the annual Fourth of July Parade scheduled for tomorrow at 10 a.m. Sections of city streets will be closed, and closed to parking, in advance of the parade including: Lincoln Avenue, Park Street, Otis Drive, Grand Street, Encinal Avenue, Central Avenue and Webster Street. An estimated 20,000 spectators will view the parade, and the Ralph Appezzato Charity Event foot race at 9 a.m. along its more than three-mile route. For all the details see the order of march below and the official event program pdfs in this week's web edition.

This year, Mayor Trish Spencer has chosen not one, but four grand women to be the Grand Marshals for the 2017 Alameda Fourth of July parade: Ginny Krutilek, Joyce Denyven, Gretchen Lipow and Weezie Mott. Each of these ladies are tireless supporters of the Alameda community in one fashion or another. They deserve city-wide recognition for their charitable work with local nonprofits and for continuously and selflessly helping the members of our community who need it most.

Ginny Krutilek

Pen patriotic poetry for parade 40th

The Fourth of July Parade in 2016 will be the 40th anniversary of the annual event, and organizers want to celebrate by involving kids in the festivities. Students who live or attend school in Alameda are eligible to participate in a youth art and poetry contest to celebrate America’s independence with the theme, “America: Let Freedom Ring.”

Local historians Dennis Evanosky and Julia Park Tracey teamed up to take part in the July Fourth parade last year. Evanosky, who is also the co-publisher of the Alameda Sun, will join the parade again this year.

The Sun is honored to publish the official parade program for the Parade Committee each year, which rewards the paper’s staff with the use of a sponsored vehicle in the parade. Last year, Bruce Knopf shared his convertible with Evanosky and Tracey.

Putting a parade of more than 150 entrants together requires the patience, passion and expertise of several local volunteers. 

Each year, the Mayor’s Fourth of July extravaganza attracts some 20,000 spectators, or roughly one-third of the city’s population.

 The parade route is longer than three miles, allowing the city to claim it as the longest parade procession ever, which no one bothers to challenge. 

ABC newscaster Michael Finney, a former Alameda resident, is the Grand Marshall at this year’s Alameda Mayor’s Fourth of July Parade. He is well known in the Bay Area for his 7 On Your Side reports on ABC7 News and his Consumer Talk radio show on radio KGO.

With the Fourth of July rapidly approaching, community members should be aware of the many assocated no parking restrictions and street closures due to take effect a week from tomorrow.
No parking restrictions will be in effect starting at 4 a.m. along the parade route. Signs will be in place well in advance to allow motorists to move their vehicles. Any vehicles in violation will be towed and stored by the Alameda Police Department. 

The Lincoln Middle School Marching Band recently accepted the first-place award for its performance in this year’s Chinese New Year Parade in San Francisco.  Students and parents from the band and music director Tyra Ingram-Cable expressed their excitement at winning the award before a packed house of more than 500 guests that included parade organizers and participants along with Miss Chinatown and her court of attendants.