Navy

The Navy has spent more than 15 years cleaning up contaminated groundwater underneath two former gas station sites at Alameda Point. They are still at it, but it’s not because the Navy is slow or lacking in commitment and expertise. It’s the nature of groundwater cleanup, which involves intermittent treatment efforts.

The Alameda Point Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) welcomed Mayor Trish Spencer to its Feb. 8 meeting. Spencer has attended RAB meetings in the past, as an interested member of the Alameda community. This visit, however, marked not only her first visit as mayor, but the only visit from any Alameda mayor in at least a decade. 

The Navy began embedding a steel barrier along several hundred feet of the western shoreline of Alameda Point during the week of Aug. 18. The area is where the Navy burned various waste materials and the barrier will contain contaminated ash and burned waste the Navy bulldozed into San Francisco Bay some 60 years ago and is now overlain with silt.

A Navy contractor will be cleaning up groundwater in part of the Town Center area next to the Seaplane Lagoon by injecting a solution of cheese whey, emulsified vegetable oil and water into nearly 200 wells that go down between 30 and 40 feet. The whey and vegetable oil will cause natural bacteria to flourish that will feed on the toxic trichloroethene (TCE) solvent causing it to break down.

Living Ship Day

The USS Hornet Museum will pay tribute to two local veterans of the famed World War II Tuskegee Air Group during its March Living Ship Day. The Tuskegee Airmen were the first African-American military aviators in the United States Armed Forces.

At 1 p.m. the Tuskegee veterans and Tuskegee historian Dave Cunningham will speak, followed by a public meet and greet.

The Hornet Band will perform big band music selections from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Air Group 11 Documentary

Pages