Navy

The Navy is nearing completion of plans for a cleanup area called Site 32, 60 acres that lie on the old airfield west of the Alameda Point Antiques Faire. The site requires remediation because investigators uncovered radium-226 there. The Navy mixed radium-226, a naturally occurring mineral, with paint to allow dials and markers to glow in the dark. Repeated exposure to high levels of radium can cause cancer. 

Data in question after falsified reports from San Francisco

Recent revelations of falsified cleanup data at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard in San Francisco have caused many people to wonder about the integrity of cleanup at Alameda Point. Can we trust the Navy’s reports concluding that goals have been met and land is suitable for transfer to the City?

The Navy thinks we can. “To date, the Navy found no indication of data falsification at Alameda,” said Cecily Sabedra, Navy environmental coordinator for Alameda Point. 

 

The Navy has completed the final round of inspections and cleanup of the last traces of the radioactive metal called Radium-226 in Building 5 at Alameda Point. The aircraft hangar complex is where the Navy refurbished its planes, including repainting tiny instrument dials, switches, and markers with glow-in-the-dark paint that contained radium. 

Radium is a naturally occurring element found in miniscule amounts in soil and water posing no health risk. Its risk comes from ingesting the element regularly, such as in industrial settings.

 

Cleanup of contaminated groundwater between Alameda Point’s Seaplane Lagoon and Main Street is about to begin. The Navy will present its plan for doing so at this evening’s Restoration Advisory Board meeting. The meeting will convene at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall West, 950 West Mall Square.

At this meeting, the Navy will also review the longterm and costly maintenance plan for the soil cover over the underground dump at the northwestern tip of Alameda Point: an area to become city property and eventually part of a regional park. 

 

Navy puts 14.9-acre former housing site up for auction

On Wednesday, April 12, the Navy will auction off part of its long-vacant property known as North Housing. The opening bid for the 14.9-acre parcel is $5 million. The federal government’s General Services Administration will conduct the auction. 

 

Navy about to transfer another large piece of former air station to city

The City of Alameda is conducting a public tour at Seaplane Lagoon to celebrate the second phase of land conveyed from the Navy Saturday, July 23. The purpose of the tour is to learn about future development plans and to take in the beautiful waterfront.

 

Alameda Landing is about to enter its final phase of development. A 2006 plan that called for all commercial on the 41-acre waterfront parcel behind Target is being replaced with a new plan. It includes an additional 375 housing units, a 124-room hotel, restaurants and a small amount of commercial space. An eight-acre waterfront park and promenade remain as the centerpiece. 

 

Alameda Point’s Seaplane Lagoon remediation continues

The City of Alameda became the new owner of Seaplane Lagoon at Alameda Point on April 13. The lagoon came from the Navy with a new condition that exceeds normal protocols for dredging in San Francisco Bay. 

The demolition of 16 former Navy apartment buildings at Alameda Point has begun. On Jan. 5, the City Council awarded a $547,000 contract to Asbestos Management Group of Oakland. The buildings are on Orion Street, West Tower Avenue, Stardust Place and Pearl Harbor Road. Demolition began this week and is expected to be completed within 60 days. Alameda Point base reuse funds are paying for the demolition.

The Navy’s cleanup program has not only removed toxic substances from below ground, it has dramatically improved some of the above-ground environment by creating new native grassland and wetlands. January rains filled the Navy’s new seasonal wetland on the northwest shoreline corner of Alameda Point and fostered growth of newly planted native grass seed on the surrounding soil.  

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