Measure B

The courts and the state of California recently delivered bad news to the Friends of Crab Cove (FOCC). The organization is fighting to stifle Alameda Point Collaborative’s (APC) plans to open a wellness center in the now-shuttered federal government buildings on McKay Avenue. FOCC has long protested the idea of opening such a center, hoping instead to have the area reserved for open space. The organization successfully created Measure B, which will appear on the ballot in a special election on April 9. If passed the measure would create open space.

 

The Alameda County Registrar of Voters posted another voter results update of the April 9 special election on Friday, April 12.

This is the third update the Registrar’s office has released since last Tuesday’s election. The new results did not change much and Measure A is still expected to pass, while Measure B will most likely fail. 

 

City Council’s recent letter misleads Alamedans about the proposed facility for Alameda County’s homeless, next to Crab Cove. The site is within walking distance of Central Avenue and Webster Street, between Washington Park and Paden Elementary School, near San Francisco Bay. Please visit before voting. 

 

The latest campaign finance filings for the two initiatives on the April special election ballot were released last week.

The We Care Alameda Yes on A committee (WCA) filed campaign statements in support of Measure A, the McKay Avenue Wellness Center Development initiative. 

 

The City of Alameda provides three affordable transportation options for older residents or those with disabilities: the free Alameda Loop Shuttle service and two discounted taxi programs. The city would like to hear feedback from riders to help ensure these programs are meeting the community’s needs. To weigh in, riders may:

The Citizens Watchdog Committee (CWC) of the Alameda County Transportation Commission (Alameda CTC) recently released its 13th annual report to the public, covering fiscal year 2013-2014 expenditures and CWC activities through June 2015.

The report confirms that Alameda CTC’s audited income and expenditures were in compliance with specific caps.

On Nov. 6, 2012, voters narrowly defeated Alameda County’s Measure B-1, a sales-tax measure that would have filled county coffers with $7.8 billion. Had the measure passed the county would have had all that money to fund its transportation projects. The measure would have doubled the transportation sales tax paid in the county from one-half cent to one full cent, forever.