measure A

The courts and the state of California recently delivered bad news to the Friends of Crab Cove (FOCC). The organization is fighting to stifle Alameda Point Collaborative’s (APC) plans to open a wellness center in the now-shuttered federal government buildings on McKay Avenue. FOCC has long protested the idea of opening such a center, hoping instead to have the area reserved for open space. The organization successfully created Measure B, which will appear on the ballot in a special election on April 9. If passed the measure would create open space.

 

The Alameda County Registrar of Voters posted another voter results update of the April 9 special election on Friday, April 12.

This is the third update the Registrar’s office has released since last Tuesday’s election. The new results did not change much and Measure A is still expected to pass, while Measure B will most likely fail. 

 

I am fortunate serve as the Mayor of a compassionate, caring city. Alamedans look out for others, even those we don’t know, as shown by the outpouring of assistance for Coast Guard personnel and families during the federal government shutdown, then enthusiastic support for the warming shelter at Christ Episcopal Church, volunteers who deliver Meals on Wheels and serve at the Alameda Food Bank, and the community-wide effort to save our animal shelter.

 

The Alameda All Faiths Coalition is an interfaith organization whose mission is to build greater communication and understanding among people of various faith traditions and to foster safety, inclusion and compassion for all Alamedans. 

In light of our stated mission, we strongly support the passage of Measure A, which will allow a highly respected non-profit in our community, the Alameda Point Collaborative, to continue with its plans to build the wellness center.

 

Although I am not a native-born Alamedan, I have resided here for 35 years and I am against the location of the wellness center on McKay Avenue. 

Save the Bay has fought to protect open space and restore shoreline habitat for almost 60 years. But saving the bay requires more than protecting habitat and open space. We must strive to create resilient, ecologically sustainable and inclusive communities that protect and uplift people in need. 

 

The latest campaign finance filings for the two initiatives on the April special election ballot were released last week.

The We Care Alameda Yes on A committee (WCA) filed campaign statements in support of Measure A, the McKay Avenue Wellness Center Development initiative. 

 

The Alameda Unified School District (AUSD) is awaiting a decision that could have a major impact on its finances in the coming years. At stake is $12 million annually that the district had been receiving from Measure A. Had all gone as planned, June 1, 2018, would have meant a seamless transition from Measure A, which voters passed in 2011 — and will “sunset” next June 1 — and Measure B1, which passed muster last November and should take effect next June 1.  

In response to Eugenie Thompson’s op-ed piece (“City Must Follow Charter,” May 29), I feel compelled to correct some factual misunderstandings that some people may have missed. Her attack appears to be based on the “fact” that our City Council, people we elected to care for our community, are not complying with the regulations. 

Measure A fact: the City Council has taken actions to reconcile local housing regulations, Measure A and state law. The basis for her distress appears that in doing so, the 40-year-old charter amendment, Measure A, has been violated. 

The only alternative: Get voter approval to change it.

Over the past two years, the City Council has taken two defiant steps toward approving nearly 4,000 new residential units primarily in the West End. 
First, on the eve of Independence Day — July 3, 2012 — the council rezoned 17 parcels with an overall site inventory capacity of 2,525 residential multi-family units outside Alameda Point for the city’s 2007-2014 housing element cycle.