McKay Avenue

 

The proposed wellness center on McKay Avenue will create less of a financial burden on the city than a city park, according to a fiscal impact analysis conducted by a California real estate advisory firm.

 

The City Council conducted a public hearing to discuss whether to amend the city’s Zoning Map and General Plan at a property near Crab Cove to create a wellness center at its Dec. 4 meeting. They also discussed future procedures after accepting a Certificate of Sufficiency for a proposed initiative measure that would prohibit the creation of the wellness center.

Part one of two

Avenue on West End belongs to U.S.

McKay Avenue, the street leading to Crab Cove, used to house a roller coaster before it became a street. It is living up to its legacy. In recent years the battle over the street, and what will become of the surplus federal property at the end of it, has had its ups, downs, twists and turns.

Environmental groups, state, activists oppose move to convey public land

On April 17, the federal government began court proceedings in U.S. District Court to seize McKay Avenue through eminent domain. The California Department of Parks and Recreation owns the street, which leads to the Crab Cove Visitor Center. 

Both Friends of Crown Beach and the Sierra Club “strongly disagree” with the federal government’s plans.

According to a letter obtained Monday by The Alamedan, the federal government plans to sue the state of California to reclaim ownership of MacKay Avenue, the street that Roseville home builder Tim Lewis Communities needs to rekindle its Neptune Pointe home building plans. Lewis is in the process of purchasing federal property along McKay.