landlords

 

Apartment association could face suit over statement in rent control piece

Renters’ rights advocates in six Bay Area cities including Alameda filed a complaint with the California Fair Political Practices Commission (FPPC) declaring a political mailer sent by the California Apartment Association (CAA) contains a misleading statement.

 

If I had anything to do with it, Measure L1 would read 
differently:

 

An initiative backed by Alameda property owners that would offer an alternative rent ordinance option appears unlikely to make it on the November ballot.

The Alameda County Registrar of Voter’s office could not verify if the signatures attached to the initiative were valid during the random sample check process.

“It is a pretty complicated process,” said Alameda City Clerk Lara Weisiger. “The Registrar’s office has their own way for calculating whether the signatures are valid during a random sample.”

 

The city’s Housing Authority is hosting free clinics for landlords and tenants on Wednesday, July 27, and Thursday, Aug. 11. The clinics will address the city’s rent stabilization ordinance. The Housing Authority is the ordinance’s program administrator. The clinics will examine tenants’ new rights and landlords’ new responsibilities under the ordinance.

 

City Council decided not to implement a funding plan that would have determined how to allocate the cost of the Rent Review, Rent Stabilization and Limitations on Evictions Ordinance at its meeting on June 21.

The rent ordinance, which came into effect March 31, is projected to cost $1.95 million annually, according to Alameda Community Development Director Debbie Potter and SCI Consulting Group, a Fairfield-based consulting firm that assists public agencies with establishment and administration of taxes, assessments, fees and other special levies. 

The passage of Ordinance 3148: A Rent Stabilization and Limitations on Evictions Ordinance has brought turmoil and unrest to the provincial city of Alameda. Tenants dislike the “no fixed cap” clause that allows landlords to raise rents as much as they please. Landlords resent the new ordinance’s paperwork and the costs and requirements Ordinance 3148 foists on them. 

 

Councilman Tony Daysog was one of three signers of a petition for a ballot measure filed with the City Clerk on March 31 that would amend the city’s Rent Stabilization and Tenant Protection Ordinance.

 

Coalition to put rent protection before Alameda voters

The Alameda Renters Coalition (ARC) has begun a petition drive to collect the necessary 6,461 signatures to put its ballot Initiative — The Alameda Renter Protection and Community Stabilization Charter Amendment — on the November ballot. The coalition, which filed the initiative with the city on Feb. 29, is aiming to collect 9,000 signatures.  

 

A signature legislation stands before us, one that will affect all Alamedans — renters and homeowners, young and old, newcomers and long-timers.
As we deliberate, all of us on the Council dais will have asked any number of questions, including: if this passes, will this stop the problem that brought us here in the first place, namely stopping excessive rent increases?

The California Bureau of Real Estate has filed a complaint against Alameda landlord Don Lindsey. As a founding member of Alamedans for Fair Rents, an organization of the city’s property owners and managers, Lindsey has stood front and center in the recent rent debate in the city.

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