frank bette center for the arts

Alameda Island Poets’ monthly free reading Wednesday, Feb. 7, from 7 to 9 p.m., will celebrate Black History Month with local poets Amos White and Wanda Sabir. 

White is an award-winning American haiku poet, author, producer, director and activist, recognized for his vivid literary imagery and breathless poetic interpretations. He has been published in several national and international reviews and anthologies. 

The Frank Bette Center for the Arts recently awarded Jennifer Kennedy its Call for Art Award for her photograph “Life Savers — a Whole Lot of Fun.” Kennedy was participating in the center’s annual Alameda on Camera event. Each photographer draws a number and — based on the number drawn — is assigned a small slice of Alameda in which to find and photograph something eye-catching. The life preserver throw ring on a fence near Alameda Fire Station No. 3 caught her eye, as well as the eyes of the judges. 

The second year of the Art in City Hall program begins tomorrow night with the opening of two new exhibits. Images from Zacatlan by Frank Bette Center for the Arts (FBCA) artists, Erica Norelius and Paul Feinberg, will be displayed on the third floor of Alameda City Hall, 2263 Santa Clara Ave., and works by Michele Mohler on the ground floor.

The Frank Bette Center for the Arts (FBCA) is holding a fundraiser called the Secret Art Sale to benefit Alameda school art programs. The sale starts tomorrow, Friday, Jan. 25 and continues through Sunday, Jan. 27. Participating schools from all over Alameda are providing student art as are artists from the area.

These pieces will be displayed anonymously and sold for $20 each throughout the sale.
The secret is the true value of the art purchased. It may be from a well-known artist or a masterpiece from a local student artist. 

Works from the annual Frank Bette Center for the Arts (FBCA) Plein Aire Paintout will go on display at a special opening reception tomorrow, Friday, Aug. 10, from 7 to 9 p.m. During the paintout, up to 40 artists from around the nation are selected to paint Alameda’s tree-lined streets, Victorian-era homes, shops, views of the Estuary, San Francisco and the Bay en plein air (outdoors). The paintings were completed in town from July 30 to Aug. 4. Artists may paint anywhere within the city limits, which include Bay Farm Island. Paintings have been juried for awards and are for sale.

Artist George Powell understands the meaning of the word “survival” better than most of us. Powell is a veteran who served in both the Vietnam and Gulf wars. He suffers from wounds inflicted in Vietnam during a battle that cost 10 of his fellow soldiers their lives. He survived that battle (and others) at a cost. 

 

A new art display titled Color Impressions has been hung featuring artists Bonnie Randall Boller and Fine Artist Renee Doty.

Boller, a native Alameda artist, has worked for more than 30 years in ceramics, clay monotype, encaustic painting and altered photography. Doty uses a variety of mediums to create landscapes both real and imagined. Some of her abstract landscapes capture Alameda subjects.   

The works of both these women will be displayed at the Frank Bette Center for the Arts’ Satellite Gallery located at Eyewise Optometry from through early 2018. 

 

In an annual tradition for the Frank Bette Center for the Arts (FBCA) now in its 12th year, 40 selected artists will take part in a coordinated effort to paint outdoors in Alameda. The artists will paint for five days straight, Monday through Friday. They come from all parts of California, and the U.S. to paint Alameda’s historic residential and commerical architecture, tree-lined streets, parks, beaches, marinas, the San Francisco skyline and the port and hills of Oakland.

 

Alameda Island Poets invites Alameda Sun readers to their monthly free reading, from 7 to 9 p.m., next Wednesday, June 7, at the Frank Bette Center for the Arts, 1601 Paru St., 
This month’s readings feature prizewinning poets Claire J. Baker and Robert Eastwood.  Open mic follows. Light refreshments will be served.

Claire J. Baker has seen more than 4,300 of her poems printed in journals, anthologies, newspapers and online. She has written 11 books, her latest Trails of Naming, Book 2.  She has won four grand prizes at the Dancing Poetry Festival.  

 

As this year’s Alameda on Camera competition began, photographer Mike Gifford joined 48 other camera buffs at the Frank Bette Center for the Arts (FBCA). They studied a map of Alameda divided into 48 sections, and then drew numbers from a hat. Each amateur paparazzo now had to shoot something — anything — within the section of the city that corresponded to the number he or she drew. Gifford drew number 48: the westernmost section of the city. 

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