environment

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Justice, State and Regional Water Boards, and environmental groups announced the Clean Water Act settlement agreement with the East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) and seven East Bay cities at a media conference at Crown Memorial State Beach Monday, July 28.

The settlement requires EBMUD, seven East Bay cities (Alameda, Albany, Berkeley, Emeryville, Oakland and Piedmont) and the Stege Sanitary District to stop sewage discharges into the San Francisco Bay.

After an outstanding event last year, the Ethical Fashion Show is back and better than ever, said event organizer Kasia Metkowski, a student at Alameda Science and Technical Institute (ASTI). The show, set for Saturday, May 31 from 6 to 8 p.m., features clothing made from 100 percent recyclable materials. South Shore Center hosts the event designed to celebrate the works of teens who choose to upcycle. 

In his response to my letter about resilient cities (“Not resilient enough,” April 24), Paul English extolls the virtues of “science” in advocacy of the carbon dioxide theory of global warming (“Facts, not hysteria, May 1). This is typical as scientists are the new godly priests who know best. 

Advocates of the theory simply repeat the same old mantras we’ve seen in the media for years, alleging the support of scientists, while exhibiting no real knowledge themselves about the subject.

The plan for a so-called “De-Pave Park” on the western side of the Seaplane Lagoon would be something to cheer about if the park had any chance of ever being created. The concept behind the park is to remove the concrete tarmac and shoreline boulders, allowing for a natural wetland shoreline. The text of the city’s recently released draft Town Center and Waterfront Plan, however, allows existing industrial buildings to remain there “if needed.”

Oakland-based artist David Burke is exhibiting his ink drawings (one of which is pictured above) on the second floor of the Main library at 1550 Oak St. through Saturday, April 26.

Burke’s ink drawings possess a toxic beauty that celebrate our desire to build, innovate and create. His work pays tribute to the resilience of the natural world and encourages viewers to reconsider our complicated and sometimes convoluted relationship to the environment.

When Alameda resident Susan Freeman visits a local grocery store and notices a shopper reaching for a plastic bag, she offers them one of her homemade cotton produce bags. Freeman intends to help Alameda become a “city without plastic bags.”

“I make them and I give them away,” Freeman said. She carries the 13x10-inch bags in a larger shopping bag in order to conveniently share them with fellow shoppers.