development

The plan for a so-called “De-Pave Park” on the western side of the Seaplane Lagoon would be something to cheer about if the park had any chance of ever being created. The concept behind the park is to remove the concrete tarmac and shoreline boulders, allowing for a natural wetland shoreline. The text of the city’s recently released draft Town Center and Waterfront Plan, however, allows existing industrial buildings to remain there “if needed.”

Extending the Bay Trail around Alameda Point has long been one of Bike Walk Alameda’s long-term visions. When the Alameda Naval Air Station closed in 1997, proponents of the Bay Trail project recognized the opportunity to complete a major section of the San Francisco Bay perimeter trail. But with great opportunities came great challenges. 

The City Council debate of the requests for qualifications from developers for plans to develop two parcels at Alameda Point and where to put 1,425 houses at Alameda Point sounded a lot like 2007. 

At last Tuesday’s meeting the city council considered a staff proposal to begin a major construction effort at the eastern entryway to Alameda Point, formerly known as the East Gate. The proposal seeks approval to solicit qualified developers for two parcels totaling 150 acres that would bring 800 new homes and a major sales-tax generator.

Last week, the City of Alameda announced it is approaching completion of plans for Alameda Point’s Waterfront Town Center area. Officials expect this area to become the heart of Alameda Point featuring retail establishments, attractions for visitors, waterfront promenades and transit-oriented multi-family housing.

The plan addresses the areas of the Point that front on Seaplane Lagoon, defined as a focal point of the new community to be developed. Planning staff has identified this location as a primary attraction among the new developments because of the waterfront.  

Oakland’s most beautiful, wild stretch of waterfront is about to go under the bulldozer. Notices have been posted around the neighborhood which warn that Signature Properties is applying for special permits to begin development on the land, without actually calling it development; so they can get around the restrictions in the environmental impact reports that have been filed for this contaminated, yet beautiful spot on the Oakland Estuary.

"You’re representing developers’ interests, not the public’s, therefore we’ll take over and do it ourselves."

I recently attended a planning meeting for people who volunteered to carry petitions to place a referendum on the November ballot to save Crown Beach and stop the City "leaders" from giving public land to a private developer — just as we did with the Chuck Corica golf course, when we, the public, told our "leaders" to stop trying to give the golf course to Ron Cowan.

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