development

Alameda Point Partners (APP) has been working with design consultants, park planners, a Planning Board subcommittee and city staff to prepare detailed designs for the individual buildings and parks within Site A.  

APP has submitted an application for design review for a 2.63-acre Phase 1 of the waterfront park along the northern edge of the Seaplane Lagoon that is intended to be constructed concurrent with Block 11. 

While the marathon City Council meeting focused largely on the rental crisis in town (see story on this page), the 10-and-one-half hour session that began with a closed session at 5:30 p.m. and recessed at 3:59 a.m. covered other topics. These included two that touched on Alameda Point. 

Councilmembers first met in closed session to hear updates on negotiations with various employee organizations, including those that represent non-sworn employees of the police department, electrical workers and managers. 

There has been recent interest about what’s going on at Alameda Marina. As one of the owners of the property, I invite you to join the discussion about plans to revitalize the underutilized and degrading marina, provide greater public access to the waterfront, and ultimately create an engaged and accessible waterfront for all Alamedans.

I think that it’s important to get the word out that one of Alameda’s most recognized locations is in danger of being bulldozed and replaced by high-density townhomes and condominiums. I’m talking about the Alameda Marina.
With changes in zoning implemented in 2012, a large part of the waterfront in Alameda that faces the Estuary was re-zoned from “light industrial” to “mixed use.” “Mixed use” allows retail, residential, light industrial and commercial properties. Since around 1965, the Alameda Marina has been a recreational centerpiece of the Northern Waterfront. 

The Planning Board is holding a workshop at 7 p.m., next Monday, Dec. 14, in the City Council Chambers to review plans for a portion of Site A. The workshop will present the architectural design and waterfront street plans for an essential element of the site at Alameda Point known as Block 11. The block fronts onto Seaplane Lagoon and a planned waterfront park near the Naval Air Museum and Wrightspeed. “Block 11 is located at the very heart of the Site A Development Plan and Alameda Point Waterfront Town Center planning area,” the city stated in a staff report. 

Alameda Point is at a significant cross-road, and so is the Alameda Point Collaborative (APC). APC was established in 1999 through a special federal homeless accommodation process. Over the last 16 years we have been successfully working to end homelessness by providing housing and services to create a community where formerly homeless families and individuals can flourish. At any given time we are serving almost 500 individuals, including almost 300 children and youth.

The city of Alameda announced recently that a new website is available to help keep residents and other interested parties informed about the development of Site A at Alameda Point. 

Developer Alameda Point Partners has launched www.alamedapointpartners.com. The site presents detailed information on the project, including ways to get involved and how to stay informed of the latest news and activities. 

What will $11,800 buy you? This amount may have influenced new contracts with the city of Alameda. In this last general election only one elected official collected contributions from a Public Safety Employee Union. That individual was Councilman Jim Oddie. 

According to the City Clerk’s office he accepted $11,799.57 from the Alameda Firefighters Association (local firefighters union) for mailers and phone banking. Not surprisingly, he fully supported and pushed for the new public safety (fire and police) contracts that were approved on April 29.

Alameda City Planner Andrew Thomas’ letter to the editor (“City planner responds,” April 30) is disingenuous and borders on ludicrous. In a carefully worded statement, Thomas states that the City Council, Planning Board, and Alameda Point Environmental Impact Report (EIR) “did not say” at multiple public hearings “that the redevelopment of Alameda Point would result in only one car.” Far from producing the “Oh, OK then!” reaction he undoubtedly wanted, this declaration simply begs the question: Why not?

Rising rents, housing prices and evictions throughout Alameda and the Bay area illustrate Paul Foreman’s point (“Rethink affordable housing in Alameda,” March 26) that “we have a long way to go to meet the affordable housing goal” the State set in Alameda’s 2015-2023 housing element. Foreman also notes that the for-profit housing market, as currently regulated by the city and state, has not, and cannot, construct the housing our workforce needs.

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