development

The nesting site was chosen by the terns, not by the Navy or U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

The “land-swap” package deal came before the Alameda City Council on Tuesday after the Alameda Sun went to press. The Sun offers this synopsis of the package that, as of this writing, pundits were predicting that the council would have already passed.

I on Alameda

There has been a secretive effort by city staff to rename one of Alameda’s beaches. It’s not only bad form, it’s a bad idea. Breakwater Beach is a small beach located at Alameda Point near the Navy’s former campground and the city’s Encinal Boat Launch Facility. The beach and its adjacent Bay Trail are under the jurisdiction of the East Bay Regional Park District. If not for the breakwater there, a barrier that protects the harbor from the force of the waves, the beach would not exist.

The Navy has announced that it has scheduled cleanup activities at several shallow groundwater sites in and around Building 5 at West Tower Avenue and Monarch Street at Alameda Point. Building 5 served the Navy as its air rework facility. Personnel not only cleaned, reworked and manufactured metal parts, but applied radioluminescent paint to aircraft dial faces and refurbished aircraft instrumentation. 

 

At its Tuesday, Oct. 4, meeting the City Council will discuss the development of Alameda Point’s Enterprise District, also noted as Area B on some maps. The district lies south of Area A, which is centered on West Atlantic Avenue and primed for residential development.  

City staff has divided the district into four zones. 

Activists concerned about the plight of a colony of jackrabbits, about to be displaced by further development at the Harbor Bay Business Park, recently posted this video to YouTube. For the background on this story, see http://alamedasun.com/news/coalition-takes-stand-wildlife.

To see the coalition's video of Bay Farm's resident rabbits, click here https://youtu.be/zhvmN4-zCjg

 

 

On Thursday, March 10, members of the city’s Recreation and Park Department took a tour of five current and upcoming park projects. The tour included the aging Encinal Boat Launch Facility, one of the few places in Alameda that offers resident direct and free access to San Francisco Bay. 

Schools aim to reduce demand

In a world that places an ever-growing emphasis on sustainability efforts, Alameda Unified School District (AUSD) has recently stepped up with a plan to reduce electric use and possibly generate renewable energy for all its facilities in the near future.

Caltrans announced that it will close the Posey Tube for inspection and maintenance from 10 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 17, to 5 a.m., the following morning. The tube, built in 1928, carries traffic from 
Alameda into Oakland.

Contractors currently working on a second project to rehabilitate the tube will continue with their work as scheduled. This includes repair, not maintenance work, and involves replacing guardrails and sidewalks, repairing and installing lighting and closed-circuit televisions, as well as rehabilitating the tube’s superstructure. 

 

The new residential and commercial developer at Alameda Point has set aside $10 million toward the construction of a passenger ferry terminal at the Seaplane Lagoon. The Bay Area’s ferry agency — the Water Emergency Transportation Authority (WETA) — however, has made it clear there is currently no funding to operate a ferry there. 

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