development

Cost Plus expected to complete move late this year

Home decor company Cost Plus World Market announced last week that it signed a lease with Brookfield Property Partners for 107,000 square feet of office space at 1201 Marina Village Parkway. 

Alameda residents will be able to review Master Plans for two Alameda developments for the first time at the Planning Board meeting this Monday, Jan. 25, at City Hall. The Planning Board will review plans for both the Block 10 area within Alameda Point’s Site A project and Encinal Terminals.

The workers pictured above have been busy this week taking down a set of non-descript graffiti-ridden buildings at 2100 Clement Ave. They are making way for a condominium complex. The buildings on the site once housed workshops for Pacific Bridge Company, one of the prestigious “Six Companies” that built the Hoover Dam. 

Bill Poland is the majority owner of Pacific Shops Inc. (PSI) that leases the land from the city where the Alameda Marina stands. He is moving forward with his plans to redevelop the site. 

According to Poland, the city “specifically designated (the marina) for mixed-use redevelopment and as a multifamily housing site to fulfill Alameda’s Housing Element commitments.” Not everyone agrees with Poland’s interpretation of “redevelopment.” Some fear that redevelopment could spell the end for all the marina-oriented businesses at the site. 

On Monday, Jan. 11, the city of Alameda Planning Board will hold two public workshops regarding Alameda Point Site A. The workshops will consider a design review for both Block 8 affordable housing, and for a waterfront park along the Seaplane Lagoon.  Staff is seeking feedback from the community and Planning Board members to inform any design revisions. The public is invited to join the discussion at 7 p.m. in the Council Chambers, located on the third floor of City Hall at 2263 Santa Clara Ave., and be part of the planning process.

The Water Emergency Transportation Authority (WETA) is aiming for the delivery of a new dock for harbor seals at Alameda Point as early as April, ahead of the start of construction of its new ferry maintenance facility this summer.

Because the maintenance facility’s new berthing dock would displace the seals’ current resting spot, a provision was approved for a new harbor seal dock as a condition for permitting the new facility. WETA, the City Council, and the Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC) approved the provision at the urging of community activists.

After 18 years, construction can begin at former base

At its July 7 meeting the City Council, by a vote of 5 to 0, passed the ordinance that will allow Alameda Point Partners, LLC, to proceed with developing Site A. The ordinance takes effect on Aug. 6.

Alameda Point Partners — comprised of srmERNST Development Partners, Madison Marquette and Thompson Dorfman Partners — should begin work on the project next July making infrastructure improvements. Work on the development will take 14 years, with completion scheduled for 2030.

More than 24 new residential and commercial buildings are proposed for construction at the 68-acre Site A project at Alameda Point, which was approved unanimously by the Planning Board Monday. All the buildings will be solar ready. But according to Joe Ernst, the project leader for Alameda Point Partners, there is no guarantee there will ever be any solar panels on the rooftops.

Last February, Southern California developer City Ventures approached the city about developing the 2.78-acre property bounded by Clement Avenue on the north, Eagle Avenue on the south, Willow Street on the west and a line drawn to the Alameda Unified School District’s warehouse on Clement from the dead end of Mulberry Street on the east. The site, which does not include the AUSD building, currently houses structures that trace their roots to Pacific Bridge Company’s World War II ship and barge-building operations (See related story this week: Buildings Once Part of Active Shipyard)

News Analysis

The lease for the Water Emergency Transport Authority (WETA) ferry maintenance comes before the City Council on March 3. Readers have expressed concerns about the harbor seal haul-out currently at the site of the facility. Despite lobbying and verbal assurance from WETA that it will build a new harbor seal haul-out, no written memorandum of understanding on the harbor seals exists for the City Council to consider. The lengthy lease agreement does not even mention the seals. 

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