birds

In 1965, the Golden Gate Audubon Society began working with Alameda conservationist Elsie Roemer to stop the Utah Construction and Mining Company from filling in salt marshes on Bay Farm Island. Conservationists, including Roemer, worked to preserve some of these marshes, including one along the shores of San Francisco Bay at the southern end of Broadway. When developers wanted to purchase this marsh, the East Bay Regional Park District stepped in and made it a part of Crown Beach. 

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife announced that the mysterious gray goo that killed 170 seabirds along the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay last month contained a mixture of non-petroleum-based fats and synthetic oils. These include silicone fluids, tung oils, resin, as well as edible and inedible seed oils from plants. 

The plan for a so-called “De-Pave Park” on the western side of the Seaplane Lagoon would be something to cheer about if the park had any chance of ever being created. The concept behind the park is to remove the concrete tarmac and shoreline boulders, allowing for a natural wetland shoreline. The text of the city’s recently released draft Town Center and Waterfront Plan, however, allows existing industrial buildings to remain there “if needed.”

Emi the Eagle grasps a check for $649 made out to the Golden Gate Audubon Society. Lorenzo Puertas of Croll’s Pizza, left, presented the funds raised through sales of unique bird-themed pizzas to the society to help create the Alameda National Wildlife Refuge. Accepting the check on behalf of the society are Linda Vallee, Leora Feeney and Cindy Margulas. To help out, call 843-2222 or write to ggas@goldengateaudoubon.org.

Park district has taken measures to protect birds

Joggers, picnickers and birdwatchers at Alameda’s Crown Beach will notice a recent installation in the landscape: cautionary signs that instruct beachgoers to stay at least 20 feet away from the roosting snowy plovers.