art

 

Eleven talented wildlife photographers will present their works in the Stafford Meeting Rooms at the Main Library, 1550 Oak St., starting this Sunday, Feb. 28. Their works include vivid photographs of wildlife, all taken in Alameda.

Organized the Friends of Alameda Wildlife the exhibition offers an opportunity to learn about species that called the Island City home. These include harbor seals, least terns, snowy plovers and brown pelicans. 

 

Mastick Senior Center is hosting a multi-media art exhibit featuring art created by members participating in the various classes offered at the center. Included in the exhibit are writings, drawings, paintings, stained glass, ceramics, jewelry, quilts and mixed-media pieces.

The exhibit is displayed throughout the lobby-wing and is available for viewing Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, contact the Mastick Office at 747-7506.

Sun Staff Reports

Painting in the traditional Chinese style is an approach that involves using Chinese ink and watercolors, special brushes and rice paper purchased in China, having a Taiwan-born and trained art teacher and speaking only Chinese in weekly studio art sessions. But high school senior, Henry Zhu, a senior at the Alameda Community Learning Center (ACLC), has always allowed a bit of California to creep into his Chinese landscapes, creating a distinctive style that blends East and West, traditional and modern.

Beijing native Ma Wei has returned to the Alameda Museum for her fourth exhibition. In 2012 her one-woman show Greed and Wish graced the museum gallery’s walls. The following year she returned a second time for Movement of Fautus. And in 2014, she came to the museum with her show Spirit of Monogatari — Zodiac.

Her current exhibition We Are the World runs through Wednesday, Sept. 30.

Alameda artist Katherine Meyer will display a collection of her charcoal drawings called Finding Your Place at the Morris Graves Museum of Art (MGMA) in Eureka, Calif. Some of the drawings take their inspiration from views here in Alameda, where Meyer lives. 

The solo exhibition will run from Saturday, March 7, through Sunday, April 19, with an opening reception set for March 7, from 6 to 9 p.m. during First Saturday Night Arts Alive — an art celebration occuring monthly on Eureka’s Main Street. Meyer will also hold an artist’s talk Sunday, March 8, from 2 to 3 p.m.

“A Light Shower” is part of The Place I Want to Be, an exhibition of oil paintings and pastel works by Carl Stieger now open at Julie’s Coffee and Tea Garden, 1223 Park St. An opening reception for the show is set for Friday, July 11, from 7 to 9 p.m.

Local art experts have been participating in monthly Art Talks for Art Lovers with the Frank Bette Center for the Arts. This months talk features Jane Alexiadis, a personal property appraiser.

While works by master or rising celebrity artists bring hundreds of millions of dollars at auctions, fine works of art can be purchased from artists, galleries, group shows and even eBay and thrift shops for a fraction of that cost. 

The public is invited to celebrate popUp Gallery’s second anniversary at the opening reception for their new exhibition of words and pictures by 11 Bay Area artists whose imagery is infused with stories.

The show titled In Other Words tells stories about the artists’ personal journeys and memories through private musings, poetry and prose and fragments of familiar novels.

Boller’s one of 117 original prints chosen

Alameda artist Bonnie Randall Boller’s “Evolving,” a clay monotype, was one of 117 original prints selected to become part of a permanent collection at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. 

Curator Katherine Blood selected the prints from the recently published book, California Society of Printmakers, 100 Years, 1913-2013. 

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