architecture

A British-born architect whose name we associate with the Arts and Crafts movement designed the house that Girls Inc. of the Island City call home today.

Ernest Albert Coxhead was born in 1863 in the English seaside town of Eastbourne, about 70 miles south London. He and his five siblings — Ernest was the fourth oldest — lived a peripatetic existence. They moved frequently as their mother, Mary, watched over them and their father, William, eked out a living as a schoolmaster. The family lived a more settled way of life after William took a job as a boarding house keeper.

Girls Inc. of the Island City, 1724 Santa Clara Ave., will host an open house to celebrate its 50th birthday from 1 to 5 p.m.., this Saturday, May 3. Girls Inc. will mark the day with live music, refreshments and birthday cake.

Do not miss a special opportunity to add a piece of art to your collection and do a good deed for animals in need. See Alameda through the eyes of an accomplished photographer who shoots and prints all her own work. No digital tricks here — just Mary Elena Goodan’s keen eye. 

On Sunday, May 4, Goodan will be offering a selection of limited-edition black-and-white prints of her views of Alameda. All proceeds will benefit Friends of the Alameda Animal Shelter (FAAS). The prints are priced to sell at $60 to $100.

In an effort to inform homeowners as to the best practices for preserving historic homes, the Alameda Architectural Preservation Society (AAPS) will be present a discussion titled, “The Mysteries of Paint Protection” this Sunday, April 13, at 7 p.m.
Presenters Pacific Northwest Painters & Construction (PNPC) will discuss what products and practices should be used when removing old paint, or applying new paint. PNPC has been owned and operated by founders Eric and Cornelia Grunseth since 1981. They have been married, living and working in Alameda for the past 32 years.