AMP

 

At the April 18 Public Utilities Board (PUB) meeting, members approved a 5 percent overall rate hike to customers of Alameda Municipal Power (AMP). The PUB decided these funds would be used to maintain reliable service while replacing aging infrastructure. The increase will go into effect Friday, July 1. 

According to AMP, the increased rates are still 18.6 percent below the average rate charged by Pacific Gas & Electric Co. in other Bay Area cities. 

The sun feels warming

Power gives us much safety

The night is for rest

Poetry isn’t something you usually expect from a power company, but this haiku was penned by staff at the Island City’s Alameda Municipal Power (AMP).

The 126-year-old power company is celebrating National Energy Awareness Month and Public Power Week by hosting a haiku contest through Sunday, Nov. 15.

On behalf of Alameda Municipal Power (AMP), I would like to clarify remarks about AMP made by Jeffery Smith in his commentary ("The Great AMP Lightbulb Caper," Aug. 27).

Smith’s assertion on the number of AMP employees it takes to change a lightbulb was certainly amusing reading, but it was also false. We were not merely changing a lightbulb; we were replacing an entire streetlight, including the pole and electrical connections that had been hit by a drunk driver. Moreover, by the time Mayor Trish Spencer contacted me, the streetlight repair had already begun.

Alameda Municipal Power’s General Manager Glenn Steiger will be the guest speaker at the Kiwanis Club of Alameda meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 24, at noon at the Elks Lodge, 2255 Santa Clara Ave. The topic will be, "AMP: What’s Next?"

"Your local green utility, AMP, will be embarking on some exciting new initiatives over the next few years," said Steiger. "While they will continue our progress toward a greener Alameda, some will also transition us to a new level of customer-focused technology."

Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) announced the artists selected to beautify the utility’s transformer boxes in the Park Street business area this week. As part of its Power Box Art project in partnership with the Park Street Business Association (PSBA) and Rhythmix Cultural Works (RCW), AMP selected nine adult artists and one student artist to have their work reproduced on a vinyl wrapper for several designated utility boxes. 

City Manager John Russo announced the appointment of Glenn Steiger as Alameda Municipal Power’s (AMP) new general manager. Steiger replaces Girish Balachandran who left the utility in December.

 
Steiger brings more than 40 years of electrical industry experience to his new job. This includes his role as deputy general manager for the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority in Ft. Defiance, Ariz. where he is responsible for all electric and broadband utility operations. 

Councilman to hold office hours
On Thursday, July 3, Councilman Tony Daysog will hold office hours from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Blue Danube Coffee House at 1333 Park St. He will be available to answer questions and offer comments on city issues. 

Daysog will also be available at the Alameda Farmers’ Market the following Saturday, July 5, from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Contact Daysog at 747-4726 or tdaysog@alamedaca.gov.

Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) announced the launch of Power Box Art. AMP is coordinating the project with the Park Street Business Association and Rhythmix Cultural Works. Power Box Art will help beautify transformer boxes in the Park Street business area.

AMP invites artists who live or work Alameda to submit art that reflects the way the community can reduce its carbon footprint. Themes include renewable power sources, cleaner transportation, recycling and reusing, shopping in Alameda, supporting local farmers and water and energy conservation. 

At its Monday meeting the Public Utilities Board unanimously approved the fifth year of Alameda Municipal Power’s (AMP) five-year rate increase. Bills will reflect the jump in rates beginning July 1. Nearly all residential customers will see a $2.25 increase on their monthly billls. 
The increase resulted from an assessment in 2010 that showed that AMP needed more revenue to meet higher power transmission costs and to replace a power contract that expires this year. 

Just 184 of the nation’s more than 2,000 public power utilities qualify for the American Public Power Association’s (APPA) highest degree of reliable and safe electric service. The publicly owned Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) earned the highest honor a Platinum Reliable Public Power Provider (RP3) can receive for providing customers with secure power service. 

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