AMP

 

This holiday season, Alameda Municipal Power offers a way to give back to the environment and be rewarded for it. 

 

Alameda has championed innovation since 1887, when the city formed its own public electric utility to power 13 streetlights. Our community was a pioneer in the new world of electricity — we developed a 90-kW generating station only five years after the first commercial energy station was established by Thomas Edison in 1882. As we plan for the future of energy in Alameda today, we can look back to Alameda Municipal Power’s (AMP) beginnings for inspiration.

 

In order to ensure access based on the Americans with Disabilities Act, the front lot of Alameda Municipal Power’s (AMP) Service Center at 2000 Grand St. will be closed to vehicle parking for repaving from Friday, July 22, through Saturday, July 23. During this time, electric vehicle charging stations and payment boxes located in the parking lot will also be inaccessible.

The service center will remain open and customers can use the sidewalk on Grand Street to reach the front entrance. 

 

The City Council approved placing the Utility Modernization Act on the November ballot. The measure passed 4-1. Mayor Trish Spencer cast the lone dissenting vote.

The act has two main proponents. The first modernizes language to update the existing Utility Users Tax. The second confirms the annual transfer of funds from Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) to the city. 

This provision protects core city services without raising tax rates, according to the city’s press release. 

 

Alameda’s community-owned utility Alameda Municipal Power (AMP), announced its general manager, Glenn Steiger, will retire effective Sept. 2. Steiger has served since 2014.

During his tenure, he launched AMP’s implementation of smart meters, increased the utility’s financial stability through balanced budgeting, introduced a local “microgrid” concept for Alameda Point’s electric system and developed a comprehensive five-year strategic plan.

 

At the April 18 Public Utilities Board (PUB) meeting, members approved a 5 percent overall rate hike to customers of Alameda Municipal Power (AMP). The PUB decided these funds would be used to maintain reliable service while replacing aging infrastructure. The increase will go into effect Friday, July 1. 

According to AMP, the increased rates are still 18.6 percent below the average rate charged by Pacific Gas & Electric Co. in other Bay Area cities. 

Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) announced the artists selected to beautify the utility’s transformer boxes in the Park Street business area this week. As part of its Power Box Art project in partnership with the Park Street Business Association (PSBA) and Rhythmix Cultural Works (RCW), AMP selected nine adult artists and one student artist to have their work reproduced on a vinyl wrapper for several designated utility boxes. 

City Manager John Russo announced the appointment of Glenn Steiger as Alameda Municipal Power’s (AMP) new general manager. Steiger replaces Girish Balachandran who left the utility in December.

 
Steiger brings more than 40 years of electrical industry experience to his new job. This includes his role as deputy general manager for the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority in Ft. Defiance, Ariz. where he is responsible for all electric and broadband utility operations. 

Councilman to hold office hours
On Thursday, July 3, Councilman Tony Daysog will hold office hours from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Blue Danube Coffee House at 1333 Park St. He will be available to answer questions and offer comments on city issues. 

Daysog will also be available at the Alameda Farmers’ Market the following Saturday, July 5, from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Contact Daysog at 747-4726 or tdaysog@alamedaca.gov.

Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) announced the launch of Power Box Art. AMP is coordinating the project with the Park Street Business Association and Rhythmix Cultural Works. Power Box Art will help beautify transformer boxes in the Park Street business area.

AMP invites artists who live or work Alameda to submit art that reflects the way the community can reduce its carbon footprint. Themes include renewable power sources, cleaner transportation, recycling and reusing, shopping in Alameda, supporting local farmers and water and energy conservation. 

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