Alameda

The annual celebration of local eateries, Alameda Restaurant Week, takes place over 11 days: from Thursday, Jan. 17 to Sunday, Jan. 27, with more than 40 participating restaurants. This is the second annual Restaurant Week in Alameda, which is part of the California Restaurant Month campaign to promote California’s culinary experiences.

The idea behind the event is to offset typically slow business in for local restaurants. During the 11days, locals can support Alameda’s dining scene by visiting participating restaurants, who will be offering prix fixe menus and specials. 

 

The City of Alameda is soliciting appointee applicants who would like to serve on the Rent Review Advisory Committee. The appointee will serve a partial term. 

The Rent Review Advisory Committee reviews rent increases, encourages communication between housing providers and tenants and renders decisions regarding rent increase requests. The committee meets the first Monday of the month, as needed. 

Alameda natives accomplished many athletic feats in 2018. Here’s part one of a two-part series looking back at some of the great athletic exploits from Alamedans in 2018.  

January
The 45th annual Alameda Elks Hoop Shoots City finals kicked off 2018 on Jan. 5. Isaiah Croxton and Mia Wong won the boys’ and girls’ eight- to nine-year-old division; Jack Omarra and Isabelle Lu won the boys’ and girls’ 10- to 11-year-old division; and Kaim Hajjem and Jayden Banaria won the boys’ and girls’ 12- to 13-year-old division. 

 

The City of Alameda provides three affordable transportation options for older residents or those with disabilities: the free Alameda Loop Shuttle service and two discounted taxi programs. The city would like to hear feedback from riders to help ensure these programs are meeting the community’s needs. To weigh in, riders may:

Outgoing Council wraps up business as new Council waits in the wings

At its final meeting next Tuesday, Dec. 18, the outgoing City Council with Mayor Trish Spencer at the helm, is scheduled to vote on the final passage of three ordinances. This meeting is scheduled to begin with a consideration of two financial reports at special meeting of the City Council and the successor agency to the Community Improvement Commission at 5 p.m. 

The Council will then hold its regular meeting to decide, among other items:

 

At last Thursday’s school board meeting at Island High School, Mialisa Bonta set a precedent. The newly elected board member went on record as the first member ever to be elected president in less time than it took to attend the first meeting as a board member. 

Alameda freshman shows the way via cell phone tour

In October, Alameda Boys & Girls Club Youth of the Year, Ja’Nylah Johnson, who now attends Bennett College in Greensboro, N.C. with a full scholarship, took some time to give her former schoolmates at Alameda’s Nea Community Learning Center a virtual tour of her campus and dormitory. Using her cell phone, Johnson showed the Nea seniors around and answered questions about her experiences at Bennett College in North Carolina.

 

The City of Alameda provides three affordable transportation options for older residents or those with disabilities: the free Alameda Loop Shuttle service and two discounted taxi programs. The city would like to hear feedback from riders to help ensure these programs are meeting the community’s needs. To weigh in, riders may:

 

To help Alameda residents prepare for the storm season, the City of Alameda’s Public Works Department opened its sandbag station at Alameda Point today, Tuesday, Dec. 4. The facility will remain open through the end of storm season. Public Works provides up to five free sandbags for Alamedans who can show proof of residency, such as an Alameda Municipal Power bill or current driver’s license with an Alameda address.

Some claim this skirts the law to facilitate the cannabis industry

At its Tuesday, Nov. 27, meeting the City Council was scheduled to introduce an ordinance that would modify the definition of a youth center. If approved by the Council, this would exclude facilities that offer martial arts and combat sports, cultural education and physical-fitness activities. In the first instance, the staff report states that a member of the public has questioned whether a martial arts studio would fall under the definition of a youth center. 

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