Alameda

 

The City Council sat in closed session for some five hours on Tuesday, Jan. 30. As with all closed meetings the subject matter remains sealed. A call to City Clerk Lara Weisiger’s office revealed that the City Council was scheduled to approve the minutes of that meeting in closed session before its regularly scheduled meeting last Tuesday after the Alameda Sun went to press. 

 

The Alameda Police Department (APD) has launched a new program to help reduce crime in the city. 

The new program is called the We S.E.E. or Share Electronic Evidence program. The program allows APD to quickly identify nearby cameras that may have captured evidence, helping solve crimes across the Island. 

 

While the City of Alameda pays for some library events, most find financial support from the Friends of the Alameda Free Library (FAL). Residents who wanted to support the library with a wider variety of materials and programs began the organization in 1974. 

FAL raises money through activities, most notably the twice-yearly used-book sale at Alameda Point and the Live @ the Library concert series each fall. The organization’s volunteers also run Dewey’s Café at the Main Library, where proceeds from food and drink sales go into fundraising coffers.

The city recently released its financial report for the fiscal year ending on June 30, 2017. It will present the findings to the City Council at its Tuesday, Feb. 6, meeting. According to the report, the city has been able to maintain General Fund reserves in excess of the City Council’s established level.

The city is inviting its residents to “Join the Conversation.” City staff is engaged in sharing a presentation called “Repairing Alameda’s Aging Infrastructure” not only at Board and Commission meetings, but with civic and business organizations, and at community events as well. 

The Alameda Free Library is proud to present its inaugural event in the occasional series “Social Science.”
 
This series will bring cutting edge science to the layperson in a relaxed and informal atmosphere, where questions are valued and interchange between scientist and audience is encouraged.
 
The event is scheduled for Sunday, Jan. 28 at 1:30 p.m. at the Main Library, 1555 Oak St.
 

For the 19th year in a row, one of Alameda’s long-standing service clubs, the Kiwanis, will host its Chili Cook-Off and Barbecue fundraiser this Saturday, Jan. 27, from 5:30 to 10 p.m. The event offers plenty of fun and feasting, especially for those with a discerning palate for chili. Vote on the best chilis from many local entrants from 6 to 7 p.m. before an all-you-can-eat, back-40, Texas-style barbecue dinner. Dance in Western attire and help the Kiwanians further their mission to support those in need at the silent auction or in the raffle.

 

City Council will vote whether to adopt the draft Transportation Choices Plan at its next council meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 16.

The Transportation Choices Plan provides an outline for how the city will improve transportation infrastructure and services in Alameda over the next 15 years to achieve two main goals. 

Federal authorities have charged Ross Gordon Laverty with mailing an explosive device with intent to kill. Laverty was arraigned before U.S. Magistrate Judge Joseph Spero in San Francisco last Thursday. Court papers revealed that the 56-year-old Oakland man allegedly mailed bombs to a home in East Palo Alto on Oct. 19, and to an Alameda address on Nov. 24. Both bombs exploded. 

 

Alameda City Council decided not to approve the proposed 589-unit Encinal Terminal project at the City Council meeting Tuesday, Dec. 19. The project, which includes a land swap agreement between the city and the developers, is now put on hold until further notice.

Mayor Trish Spencer said she did not support the project over her concerns about the site’s location. Researchers have said the site may be subject to liquefaction and a rise in sea-level could also pose a threat to the housing units.

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