Alameda

The Frank Bette Center for the Arts’ (FBCA) 14th annual Plein Air Paint Out (PAPO) is currently underway through this Saturday, Aug. 3. Some 40 juried artists will paint homes, streets, shorelines and all over town.

Alamedans who have visited Alameda’s shoreline parks, Elsie Roemer Bird Sanctuary, Crown Beach or Seaplane Lagoon have likely seen the elegant snowy egret. The Audubon Society’s Guide to North American Birds describes the snowy egret as, “A beautiful, graceful, small egret, very active in its feeding behavior in shallow waters. Known by its contrasting yellow feet, it could be said to dance in the shallows on golden slippers.”

The lineup of makers at the Alameda Mini Maker Faire was announced last week. More than 75 exhibitors will display their works and get people involved in making. 

Members of the East Hills 4H American Girl and Boy History Club, based in Alameda, collected food and beverages to donate to the Alameda Food Bank recently.

This past year, the 4H Club studied significant periods of American history in conjunction with American Girl historical dolls, books and films. The food drive was inspired by American Girl character Kit Kittredge who grew up during the Great Depression.

Part Two
This past spring, the Haight Renaming Committee invited Alameda Unified School District students to write essays and letters sharing their thoughts about renaming Haight Elementary School. “Should Haight School be renamed? Why or why not?” For the youngest winners, see part one of this story in last week’s edition. All writers are students at Lincoln Middle School unless otherwise noted.

Alameda Recreation and Park Department will team up with the Alameda Gators Swim Team tomorrow, Friday, Aug. 2, through this Sunday, Aug. 4, to host the city’s 65th annual City Swim Meet. 

Swimmers of all ages will enjoy this fun and low-key meet at the Encinal High School Swim Center, 230 Central Ave. The meet includes novice events, age-group races and masters’ events.  

The City of Alameda’s Climate Action and Resiliency Plan (CARP) adopted by City Council on July 16 marks an enormous step toward sustainability and combating climate change. The plan focuses on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, increasing climate resilience and addresses one of Alameda’s most pressing issues: sea-level rise. 

One of the areas at highest risk for flooding lies in the vicinity of the Webster and Posey tubes, with expected flooding of a minimum of 36 inches. 

Two new hotel projects move forward

The Planning Board unanimously approved two hotel projects to move forward on the path to construction at its July 22 meeting. 

The ongoing partner project between the Alameda Sun and Alameda Backyard Growers, Project Tree, now in its second phase, has continued to benefit Alameda residents interested in planting trees. The first phase in 2017 offered a limited variety of fruit or shade trees gratis. Phase two offered each Alameda resident who attended a tree-care workshop a coupon with a redemption value of $25 off the price of one tree at either of the town’s local nurseries. 

Divided community response reflects attitudes toward Council’s legal fees

At its July 16 meeting, the City Council agreed with all four findings in the Alameda County Grand Jury 2018-2019 report regarding the 2017 Alameda Fire Chief hiring process investigation. Mayor Marilyn Ezzy Ashcraft, Vice Mayor John Knox White and Councilmember Tony Daysog voted to agree to the findings. Councilmembers Malia Vella and Jim Oddie recused themselves from the discussion. 

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