Alameda

Children from Temple Israel’s Hebrew School helped out on Sunday, Oct. 27, at a loading party to help fill an Alameda Food Bank truck with more than 225 bags of groceries. The congregation donated the groceries during the temple’s High Holy Days food drive. The temple gave its congregants grocery bags on Rosh Hashanah, which fell this year from sunset Sept. 29 to sunset Oct. 1. These days mark the beginning of 10 days of repentance that end with the holiest day of the year, Yom Kippur, this year from sunset Oct. 8 until nightfall Oct. 9. 

Cliff-hanger touchdown can’t save San Leandro, 13-12

Encinal High School senior Jets linebacker Jezaiah Naigulevu had seen this before. Last year the San Leandro High School Pirates had put the ball in the hands of a senior leader who scored a game-winning touchdown, defeating the Jets, 18-13. 

This year Naigulevu was ready. The linebacker stuffed Pirates running back Osaro Aihie on a game-winning, two-point conversion attempt that fell just short of the goal line, giving Encinal a 13-12 victory.

The Alameda Soccer Club boys’ Under-16 team the Alameda Falcons took first place at the San Ramon Fall Shootout Sept. 29.

The Alameda Holiday Boutique, a four-decade tradition in the Island City, takes place this weekend, Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 2 and 3, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Albert H DeWitt O’ Club at Alameda Point. The event showcases local artists and artisans who display handcrafted works, gourmet food items, antiques, collectibles and more for sale as gifts for the holidays.

Mayor Marilyn Ezzy Ashcraft and the City of Alameda’s Social Service Human Relations Board will honor the contributions of individuals, businesses and nonprofits at the annual Community Service Awards Ceremony next Thursday, Nov. 7, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Elks Lodge Ballroom, 2255 Santa Clara Ave.  

This event is open to the public and free of charge. A light dinner will be served. Reserve seats by tomorrow, Friday, Nov. 1, at https://2019community-service-awards.eventbrite.com.

Alameda Police Department (APD) officers were called to San Leandro Bay near Driftwood Lane after a call that a dead body was floating in the water Saturday, Oct. 26. A few residents congregated behind Small Size Big Minds Preschool near Driftwood Lane while APD was investigating the situation.

“I first saw a women talking to an officer,” said Alameda resident  Joshua Linville. “When I looked down, I saw another officer near the water next to a floating body face down.” 

Thousands of Alameda residents were left without power for a few hours Sunday, Oct. 20, after a utility pole on Eagle Avenue was damaged. The power outage began at 9 a.m., according to reports. It affected about 2,700 residents on the city’s West End. 

Porches on the East End last Saturday became impromptu cabarets as part of the first-ever Alameda Porchfest — East End edition. Organized with the intention of sharing the talents of the Island City’s young musicians, the event proved a success with 10 seperate acts spread out over three porches: on Broadway, Central Avenue and Fountain Street. The Fountain Street Stage, above, featured four bluegrass acts: Jubilee, Minor Strings, CUBG and The Tone Rangers. The award-winning musicians of Jubilee are shown performing above.

Rushing in where even fools fear to tread, I thought I would look at the rent question from a slightly different angle: the economics of the situation.

There are many different types of landlords. There are wealthy professional investors and aspiring professional investors, who attempt to leverage the little that they have into something bigger. Older people often attempt to add to retirement income by renting property. All of these people face similar costs. 

Family works with Guatemalan artisans to host event

In a one-day special event set for Saturday, Nov. 2, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the Frank Bette Center for the Arts (FBCA), 1601 Paru St., will play host to a Guatemalan Mercado (Market). This colorful sale of crafts from Guatemala comes to Alameda through the work of Curt Porter.

Porter and his family have been working with the indigenous people of Guatemala since 1985, buying hand-made goods at fair market prices directly from families they’ve gotten to know. 

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