alameda point

 

A representative from the city of Alameda will discuss details of the proposed Seaplane Lagoon Ferry Terminal plan in front of the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC) next Tuesday, June 7.

Alameda Point CEO Jennifer Ott will lead a collaborative that includes a representative from the Water Emergency Transportation Authority and two marine design teams, to give a presentation about the project in front of BCDC’s design review board. 

 

The Alameda Point Collaborative (APC) served up gourmet meals at its annual Urban Farm Table fundraising event on Sunday, May 15. About 100 guests were seated under a canopy squarely in the middle of crops growing on the Alameda Point farm. 

This year’s menu was again created by Jeff Rosen, executive chef at Blue Heron Catering of Oakland. Some of the salad and entrée ingredients, such as arugula, strawberries and onions were grown within a few steps of the table. 

 

Monday, July 4, will mark the 40th year that the Alameda community has celebrated the birth of the nation with a R.A.C.E. and Fourth of July parade. Television news channel KRON 4 will cover the parade for the first time this year. 

New to the celebration this year is the fact that South Shore Center and Area A at Alameda Point are sponsoring late afternoon music and entertainment. Two seperate events to enjoy following the parade will take place at the shopping center and Alameda Point at Seaplane Lagoon. 

 

On Thursday, March 10, members of the city’s Recreation and Park Department took a tour of five current and upcoming park projects. The tour included the aging Encinal Boat Launch Facility, one of the few places in Alameda that offers resident direct and free access to San Francisco Bay. 

The front page of the Feb. 18 Alameda Sun had a photo of Block 11 at Alameda Point. Its caption read, “The San Francisco skyline is visible in the background.” Given that the depicted building is six or seven stories high, it won’t be long before the denizens of San Francisco will look to the east and note the Alameda skyline.

The new residential and commercial developer at Alameda Point has set aside $10 million toward the construction of a passenger ferry terminal at the Seaplane Lagoon. The Bay Area’s ferry agency — the Water Emergency Transportation Authority (WETA) — however, has made it clear there is currently no funding to operate a ferry there. 

Alameda Point Partners (APP) has been working with design consultants, park planners, a Planning Board subcommittee and city staff to prepare detailed designs for the individual buildings and parks within Site A.  

APP has submitted an application for design review for a 2.63-acre Phase 1 of the waterfront park along the northern edge of the Seaplane Lagoon that is intended to be constructed concurrent with Block 11. 

The Navy’s next Alameda Point Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) meeting will be held this evening, Thursday, Jan. 14, at 6:30 p.m. at 950 W. Mall Square on Alameda Point. Everyone is welcome to attend to hear updates about the Navy’s cleanup and talk directly with the Navy and regulatory agency representatives about issues at Alameda Point. 

Learn more at the Navy’s website www.bracpmo.navy.mil; click on BRAC bases, California and Alameda NAS.

While the marathon City Council meeting focused largely on the rental crisis in town (see story on this page), the 10-and-one-half hour session that began with a closed session at 5:30 p.m. and recessed at 3:59 a.m. covered other topics. These included two that touched on Alameda Point. 

Councilmembers first met in closed session to hear updates on negotiations with various employee organizations, including those that represent non-sworn employees of the police department, electrical workers and managers. 

The Navy recently decided that North Housing — a vacant residential area located between Alameda Point and Alameda Landing — is safe for transfer. The approval comes after the Navy stopped a program to clean groundwater at the site to drinking-water standards. 
In 2013, the Navy turned off its air pump and carbon filter vacuum cleanup system to see if it made any difference in the concentrations or movement of contaminants. It didn’t. 

Pages