alameda point

Cleanup Project Finds Home at Point

Five large patches of garbage, called gyres, swirl around the earth’s oceans. The largest clogs aquatic life in the Pacific Ocean. The Ocean Cleanup, a Dutch nonprofit, founded by Boyan Slat when he was just 18 years old, has designed a system to help clean up that mass of refuse and debris. 

The tour operator of a seaplane who landed at Alameda Point found himself in hot water with the city recently. A 1992 Piper single-engine seaplane landed and took off twice in the harbor near the USS Hornet Museum on Saturday, Feb. 3. The plane’s identification was reported to the city by the Alameda Point Harbor Seal Monitors. The group had photographed the same plane in October after it landed near the harbor seal float.

On Feb. 14, the City of Alameda sent a cease-and-desist letter and notice of trespass to Saul Singer, who operates Sea Plane Adventures of Mill Valley. 

 

Alameda is taking steps toward a bright future at Alameda Point. However, the city continues to stumble on the former Naval Air Station’s deteriorating infrastructure. The latest tripping stone centers on 75-year-old drains serving brand-new tenants.

At the center is a consent decree that the city signed in 2014. At question is whether that decree requires the city to take a “replace-as-you-go” tack as it sails toward completion of Alameda Point. Or does it allow a build-now, replace-the-drains-later plan?

 

Housing, new tenant, improvements scheduled for Point

The city has announced it is moving forward with bringing affordable housing to Alameda Point. In addition, the city said that a forward-looking Oakland company is coming to the Point and improvements to the infrastructure there are moving forward.  

Nea family finds corporate support for Point residents

When Alameda Point families experienced water-quality difficulties, (“Point’s Water-Quality Situation Now Resolved,” Sept. 21) Nea Community Learning Center (Nea), put out a call for donations. Both the Nea community and Alameda Landing Target stepped up to help.

 

The Alameda Point water that was contaminated with non-potable water last week has been deemed safe for drinking, cooking and bathing by the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Division of Drinking Water. The Alameda Point do-not-drink advisory was lifted Friday.

The Alameda Police Department (APD) released a Nixle report stating, “The water once again matches the East Bay Municipal Utility District’s (EBMUD) high-quality water supply consistent with other areas outside of the Alameda Point water system.”

 

This weekend the Bank of Marin’s Alameda Running Festival takes place at Alameda Point with an expanded Health and Fitness Expo, beer garden, live music after Sunday’s half marathon and three flat and unique run courses that showcase the beauty of the Island. 

A 5-kilometer run will kick off the weekend’s events at 9 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 16. This year the 5k, along with the Health and Fitness Expo is presented by Penumbra Inc. 

 

Alameda techonology company Saildrone has produced a sailing robot at Alameda Point. The National Oceanic and Atomospheric Administration (NOAA) will use the drone to study sealife. NOAA will distribute five of the unmanned vehicles to track melting ice, measure carbon dioxide levels in the ocean and count numbers of fish and sea mammals.

 

On Saturday, July 15, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. skateboarders will be competing in the third annual Clay “C-Bone” Harding skate tournament. This is an all-day family-friendly event in which 100 percent of the proceeds will go towards the City View Skate Park. 

The event will feature local bands, live entertainment, great food and an auction to help raise funds for the skate park. In past years, funds have been spent to improve the park with a mural, sculpture and a shade structure. 

 

On Wednesday, July 5, Alameda City Council considered an amendment to the Alameda Point Site A Plan, for the portion of Alameda Point currently under development. Alameda Point Partners and the City have created a solution that would maintain the integrity of the original development while delivering the need for housing. 

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