Alameda Municipal Power

An Alamedan has been on a mission to prove Alameda Municipal Power’s (AMP) newly installed smart meters emit more radio-frequency (RF) radiation than AMP suggests.

 

As many Alamedans know, Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) has been implementing its Smart Meter program in residential neighborhoods. What most Alamedans do not know, however, is the hidden potential for danger these radio-frequency (RF) radiation-emitting devices have. There is current evidence of a link between cancer and RF radiation. This includes a $25 million study by the federal government’s National Toxicology Program that proves the link.

 

Every October, Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) joins with more than 2,000 other community-owned electric utilities in the U.S. to honor the contributions of public power. This year’s celebration of Public Power Week (Oct. 1 to 7) resonates for me because I recently joined AMP as general manager during the utility’s 130th year of providing electric service to Alamedans. This is a pivotal time for AMP. 

 

The Power Up for Learning program, a joint effort between local nonprofit Alameda Education Foundation (AEF) and Alameda Municipal Power (AMP), provides students in Alameda’s schools access to technology curriculum focused on robotics based at Wood Middle School. 

 

Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) has earned two separate top 10 rankings from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the U.S. Department of Energy’s primary national laboratory for renewable energy and energy efficiency research. Specifically, the municipally owned utility’s program Alameda Green earned these awards.

 

Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) has an exceptionally high record of reliable electric service. The utility does want its customers to know that continuous periods of hot weather can tax the electric transmission and distribution systems and the equipment relied on to deliver electricity to Alameda’s homes and businesses. 

 

Our electric company may be publicly owned, but public participation is down because it requires too much energy.

 

The one renewable resource that Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) doesn’t get credit for is the never-ending stream of exaggerated claims about its green credentials. Look closer at its policies on solar power, selling off “extra” renewable power, local power generation and the health of our state’s rivers and streams as they relate to hydropower. You’ll find shortcomings that don’t match the rhetoric.

Last year, AMP changed its rate structure for rooftop solar to make it less favorable for owners of new installations. In May, the financial incentives were again reduced.

 

Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) staffer Bill Garvine attended last Saturday’s Big Truck Bonanza with his daughter-in-law Tanya Garvine and his grandchildren, two-month-old Dakota and three-year-old Huston. Huston had fun exploring the parking lot behind City Hall filled with fire trucks and engines, police vehicles and trucks from AMP and Public Works, including a street sweeper, a derrick digger, a bucket truck and a backhoe. Staff from each department were on hand to answer questions and keep the children safe.

 

On behalf of Alameda Municipal Power (AMP), I would like to respond to comments about AMP and renewable energy made by Tony Brasunas in his letter to the editor (“Solar program to sunset,” March 30.)

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