Alameda

Alamedans participated locally in a nationwide demonstration last Saturday intended to send a message of disapproval to U.S. President Donald Trump. Following in the pattern of the Women’s March held in 2017, the women aimed to send “a resounding message that we reject President Donald Trump. In Washington D.C., there will be targeted, direct actions where some of us will put our bodies on the line.”

More on housing measure’s history

Last evening a contentious Planning Board meeting at City Hall featured a discussion of the 1973 Measure A. In its Jan. 23 edition, the Alameda Sun will cover that meeting in detail and offer another installment of this series about the measure. 

On Jan. 9, approximately 60 Alamedans gathered downtown to express opposition to any U.S. escalation of hostilities toward Iran after missile strikes transpired on each side. The anti-war vigil was one of more than 350 held nationwide, including larger events in Oakland and San Francisco.

Measure A is an exclusionary zoning charter amendment adopted by the Alameda electorate in 1973 designed to prohibit construction of multifamily housing. Proponents emerged in opposition to the proposed development of Harbor Bay Isle by Utah Construction and Doric Development and the pro-growth City Council incumbents. Although purported to “protect the environment,” an examination of the stated positions of the original “framers” and opponents, and the multiple legal challenges can help Alamedans understand how Measure A prolonged racial and economic inequalities.

At a public hearing during Monday’s meeting, Alameda Point Partners (APP) asked the Planning Board to allow changes that would scale back both the building on Block 11 on Seaplane Lagoon and the adjacent Waterfront Plaza. 

An Alameda resident and student at Bishop O’Dowd High School, Abigail Gonzalez, recently traveled to Washington, D.C., to participate in the 2019 Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice. The annual gathering promotes social justice and solidarity by challenging people to participate in caring for others. The main talking points of the weekend were climate justice and immigration.

At Tuesday’s City Council meeting after the Alameda Sun went to press, Council voted on a plan for new homes located at 2800 Fifth St. Pulte Home Company, LLC, looks to construct 69 buildings containing 357 residential units in a new phase for the 17.2-acre Alameda Landing waterfront mixed-use development.

On Oct. 14, the Planning Board approved the application that also includes: 5,000 square feet of commercial space, internal roadways and alleys, parks and open space. 

Part one in a series 
A number of incidents involving pedestrians, motor vehicles and bicyclists have recently marred Alameda’s tranquility. Many of these — and those in the past — involve people, young and old, misunderstanding the city’s ordinances that govern how we all must interact safely. 

City Council adopts Vision-Zero policy at Nov. 5 meeting

Up to 100 people took part in an “Alameda School Zone Safety Rally” at City Hall Nov. 5. Love Elementary School’s PTA joined with other schools, PTAs and student advocates from across the Island for the rally just before the City Council meeting. The group spoke to the Council and city staff, “so that these safety issues are addressed immediately to make our streets safe for students and to prevent further accidents.”

The City of Alameda recently disclosed that it is not going to proceed with the preparation of an environmental impact report on the Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatient and columbarium project at Alameda Point, as previously announced in February. 

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