Alameda News

More than 200 Girls Inc. supporters, participants and staff attended the 16th annual Women Who Dare awards ceremony and fundraiser last Saturday at the Al Dewitt O’ Club. Hosted by Girls Incorporated of the Island City, the event recognized women and teens who exemplify risk, resiliency, and reward, the theme of the event. The event also showcased the transformative power of Girls Inc. programming in an era when 78 percent of girls are at risk for body image issues, 30 percent are at risk of teen pregnancy and 20 percent are at risk of abuse.

The San Francisco skyline serves as a backdrop to the Mercedes Benz F 015, an experimental driverless automobile.

Driverless vehicle visits Alameda

Driverless cars have yet to appear on Alameda’s streets, but one was recently seen tooling around Alameda Point. PC World Executive Editor Melissa Riofrio was there to catch all the action.

The city of Alameda firefighters’ overtime pay totaled more than $1 million last year, but there is another budgetary issue that needs to be examined.

Last year the city spent $1,160,694 on overtime pay for the Alameda Fire Department (AFD). But, they also had to pay $198,840 in acting pay.

Acting pay is money firefighters are paid when a particular employee temporarily holds a higher position because one of the four fire stations are short staffed for a time.

"This is also unavoidable," said Alameda firefighters’ union president Jeff Del Bono.

The Alameda Chamber of Commerce announced this week that it has moved its headquarters from one unit to another within the South Shore Shopping Center.

The new office address is 2215-A South Shore Center between Trabocco restaurant and Towne Cleaners in the alleyway next to Trader Joe’s and Safeway.

The space vacated by the Chamber (2210-D South Shore Center) will become Pinot’s Palette, a business where visitors can bring a bottle of wine and some friends and then work step-by-step with a local artist to produce featured paintings to take home.

A trip to Alameda’s Farmers Market is always a colorful experience.

l foodies flock to the quaint Farmers Market on Haight Avenue just off Webster Street. I arrive on my fire engine red bicycle as part of the zero emission market aficionados who leave their cars at home and walk, bike or ride the bus. There is an air of therapeutic leisure here, unlike shopping at major supermarkets where 40,000 packaged foods are nothing more than manufactured edibles (some inedible). They overwhelm the brain as shoppers grab and pick through the shelves and dump it all in a cart in a hurry.

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