Schools

An artist living in Alameda for 15 years, Vicki Newcomer’s determination and resilience to achieve a lifetime goal came to fruition on Friday, May 25, when she graduated from Laney College. She raised her family and studied art for her own pleasure and development. 

“After many years of challenging herself to grow as an artist and student, she has finally received a diploma in ceramics,” stated her daughter Jennifer Gilbertson.

More 80 students representing 12 teams from Alameda’s public schools participated in this year’s Alameda Education Foundation’s (AEF) robotics competition. First place went to Wood Middle School’s “Well Done Pepes.” The Franklin Elementary Vaccines and Bay Farm Dophins tied for second-place honors. Wood’s fourth- and fifth-grade team, the Space Bots, captured third place.

Three graduating high school seniors in Alameda have been awarded 2018 eQuality Scholarships for their service to the LGBT+ community. 

Kaitlin Alcontin and Ella Burk, students at Encinal High, and Danny Charney of Alameda High were among the 19 recipients announced at the 29th eQuality Scholarship Awards Dinner held May 14 at Delancey Street Town Hall in San Francisco.

Each student was awarded $6,000 toward their post-secondary education, bringing the total distributed to more than $1.3 million since the first scholarship was awarded in 1989.

Edison Elementary School kindergarten teacher and arboreal fan, Jennifer Nelson, showcased her “A Rainforest Grows In Alameda” lesson and exhibit for her students and parents to explore on Open House Night, last Thursday, May 17. Her mission is to teach children about the wonder of trees and how they provide nurture for the symbiosis of flora and fauna. 

 

Lincoln Middle School student Hazel Purins represented Alameda County at the Junior High State Spelling Bee Championship Saturday, May 5, in San Rafael. She finished 28th out of 50 at the state competition. She topped 27 other spellers who finished first or second in their respective counties.

“She was kind of bummed she didn’t spend more time training,” stated Hazel’s mom, Carrie, in an email. “She heard that the top three finishers would get recommendations so they could compete in the Scripps National Bee, and that was news to us.”

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