Kids Stuff

Children from Temple Israel’s Hebrew School helped out on Sunday, Oct. 27, at a loading party to help fill an Alameda Food Bank truck with more than 225 bags of groceries. The congregation donated the groceries during the temple’s High Holy Days food drive. The temple gave its congregants grocery bags on Rosh Hashanah, which fell this year from sunset Sept. 29 to sunset Oct. 1. These days mark the beginning of 10 days of repentance that end with the holiest day of the year, Yom Kippur, this year from sunset Oct. 8 until nightfall Oct. 9. 

Alamedan’s project addresses issues at Mexico border

Late last year, 11-year-old Kaia Marbin from Wood Middle School and her friend, 10-year-old Lily Ellis from Berkeley, wanted to let the country know that the 15,000 children the federal government was holding in detention centers were loved and supported. To accomplish this they created “The Butterfly Effect.” The program aimed to create and publicly display 15,000 handmade origami butterflies. Each butterfly would represent one child the government had separated from his or her family.

Lincoln Middle School students Juliana Chinzorig, 12, whose sign reads “There is no Planet B” and Katelyn Le, 12, with sign reading “Act as if our home is on fire, because it is!” attended the Oct. 12 City Council meeting to help bring awareness to human-caused climate change. The duo continued efforts begun by students internationally to bring attention to what younger generations see as a critical issue affecting their future.

On Sunday, Oct. 13, at noon, local skateboarders who frequent Alameda’s Cityview Skatepark, 1177 W. Red Line Ave., will host the fifth annual “Land or Slam Skate Jam” fundraiser there in memory of the late Clay Harding, an Alameda skateboarder who lost his life in 2014.

The event is free for spectators and features barbecue, local art and music and a skateboarding contest. Prizes donated by local skate shops will be given in three age categories.

Registration for the skating contest starts at 11 a.m. with a $5 entry fee. The contest is open to all ages and all genders.

Alameda High School senior Caroline Choi traveled to New York City (NYC) last week to participate in the third annual NYC Green Schools Conference. She addressed the  international convention hosted as part of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) and Climate Week Sept. 25. 

As a member of Project Green School’s National Youth Council, Choi was invited to speak at the conference about her role in starting Community Action for a Sustainable Alameda (CASA) Youth, as well as founding an environmental club on her high school campus called “Amplify.”   

Pages