Island Arts

Photographer Richard Whittaker is exhibiting his black and white photographs at the Alameda Free Library from Wednesday, April 2, through Monday, June 30, in the Regina K. Stafford Meeting Room at the Main Library, 1550 Oak St.

Whittaker is the CEO of Works & Conversations and the West Coast editor of Parabola magazine. His photography has appeared in San Francisco Magazine, The Sun and Parabola, and was recently featured at the Di Rosa Gatehouse Gallery, Green Chalk Contemporary in Monterey and Berkeley Art Center.

As part of their mission to bring cultural experiences from other islands to the Island City, Rhythmix Cultural Works (RCW) presents the Island Arts Concert series. Launching the series this year is the Cuban Maestro Fito Reinoso y sus Clasicos De Cuba (and the Classics of Cuba).

The fun starts Saturday, March 29, at 7:30 p.m. with a salsa lesson. The concert begins at 8:30 p.m.

A group of Alameda and East Bay artisans have announced they will be holding a boutique sale Sunday, April 6, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m at the Harbor Bay Community Center (3195 McCartney Road).

Those interested in unique items including jewelry, floral designs, home décor, food items, art, dolls, crocheted items, soaps, goat-milk lotions, tote bags, table linens, children’s books by local authors will enjoy this event.

An artist blacksmith will be on site to sharpen knives and garden tools as well.

Students from Alameda High School (AHS) are presenting their watercolors, drawings and image transfer projects now through March 26 at Rhythmix Cultural Works’ K Gallery. The show is titled  A Brief Display of Works: Alameda High School and Charlie Milgrim.

Along with the student works some cardboard sculpture and artwork by their teacher Charlie Milgrim will be on display.

The Encinal High Drama Department is currently presenting the mega opus extravaganza: Hairspray.

Based on the 1988 John Waters film of the same name, this musical is ostensibly centered on 1960s-style dance music and “downtown” rhythm and blues; but don’t be fooled.

The music and dancing takes place on the “Corny Collins Show,” a diminutive version of “American Bandstand,” but with an audience of thousands, not the millions that Dick Clark enjoyed.

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