Island Arts

A new art exhibition at the Alameda Free Library, 1550 Oak St., is featuring paintings by local artist Jeffrey Allyn. The show runs through March 28.

Allyn received a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts from Cal State Long Beach. His art has a foundation in the workings of the physical universe, but unlike the tight control and confines bio-medical illustration, it has a highly emotional and colorful release in the abstract. 

He said that the artists who most influence his work are Vincent van Gogh, Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin, Paul Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and Willem de Kooning. 

Abstract art just one exhibition up at midtown gallery

The new show at the Frank Bette Center — Driven to Abstraction — is unique in a number of ways. Immediately, the viewer will notice several very large pieces in a gallery usually designed with more but smaller pieces. Arlene Risi Streich’s “Sea Ranch,” for example, is a big, adventurous mixed-media piece arranged in a landscape-like format with a hot yellow sky behind a field of rich texture and color.

A scene from Lincoln Park by Ginny Parsons

A satellite exhibition of recent paintings of Alameda scenes by local artist Ginny Parsons will open for in the Alain Pinel Realtors office at 2212 South Shore Center.

An opening reception will be held this Saturday, Feb. 7, from 4 to 6 p.m.

Raised in Chico, Parsons has called Alameda her home for more than 20 years.

The Island City’s cultural meeting place, Rhythmix Cultural Works, has become synonymous with diverse musical productions that present this historic expressions of a particular cultural background.

Thursday night, resident flute player Stephen Shultz, along with four other internationally renowned flute players, brought music from the French court of King Louis XV to life on the Alameda stage with "Five Fantastic Flutes."

Altarena Playhouse’s current show, Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park, is an old favorite. You may know it from the Robert Redford-Jane Fonda 1967 film version of the same name, where a young couple take on married life without knowing very much about each other. Simon made his screenwriting debut in this wistful domestic comedy set in Greenwich Village that centers on Paul and Corie Bratter in a fifth-floor walkup. Much of the play’s comedy focuses on the apartment’s Spartan furnishings, lack of heat and those dreaded five flights of stairs (six, if you count the stoop).

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