Health Matters

 

A client told me about a conversation with her teenage daughter. She had told her daughter about some changes that were going to be occurring in the family. The daughter responded by saying that she was very angry. A few days later, the mother asked her to spend a few hours with her, just the two of them. The daughter refused, and the mother was very distressed. 

An enlightening talk on the healthful effects of mushrooms is on tap at Alameda Natural Grocery Wednesday, Jan. 24, from 6 to 7 p.m. The presentation is courtesy of Mikael Makinen, co-founder of Four Sigmatic, a superfood company founded by a group of Finnish friends. They aim to popularize medicinal mushrooms by incorporating them into more mainstream products like coffee and hot cocoa. 

Nearly 50 million American adults have significant chronic pain or severe pain, according to a new study prepared by National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. This costs the nation up to $635 billion each year in medical treatment and lost productivity. The pain can range from annoying to debilitating. 

 

People who come to my office are seeking relief or change. It may be a relationship problem such as a dissatisfying marriage or partnership. It may be problems with a child. It may be conflict at work or in their family. Many are struggling with emotional concerns, such as depression or anxiety. Others have physical issues that are contributing to stress, frustration or sleep problems. 

This is a simple overview of issues that are far more complex for the one who is distressed. 

In 1991, I was asked by a university to speak on the subject of sexual harassment. It was a topic that emerged from the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court by President George H.W. Bush. After his nomination, Anita Hill, a former employee of his, came forward citing numerous examples of ways he had sexually harassed her. There were hearings and she testified. In the end, he was appointed. 

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