Health Matters

 

Most people live very active lives, including work, taking care of children, providing transportation, attending meetings, housekeeping, helping friends and relatives, shopping, exercising, cooking, arranging for extracurricular activities and more. There is time on the phone and computer, the need to check mail and pay bills. Perhaps a haircut or manicure is required. People take time to play in, or attend, sporting events or socialize with friends and family. 

More than 50 years ago President Lyndon B. Johnson proclaimed February American Heart Month. Every year doctors announce new magic pills or surgical techniques to cure heart problems. Cardiovascular disease has been attributed to smoking, eating habits, weight problems, high-cholesterol, high blood pressure and just plain genetic bad luck. 

 

I had lunch with a dear friend today. She mentioned that she was walking down the street in Alameda the other day and a person she did not know smiled and said “Hello.” She finds the warmth of Alameda to be a pleasure and began to reiterate many of the small meaningful experiences she finds in this city.

 

In the past, doctors typically took the lead and patients followed.Today, a good patient-doctor relationship is more of a partnership. This means asking questions if the doctor’s explanations or instructions are unclear, being comfortable enough to bring up concerns and having an open dialogue about a particular treatment or change in daily life.

Local Medicare office blends hospitality with healthcare

Most people have probably experienced this process at a doctor’s office: first, check in at reception. Sit down. Go back to reception to pick up forms. Sit down. Return the forms to reception. Sit down. Finally the doctor is ready, and you’re exhausted before the appointment has started.

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