Health Matters

A dramatic jump in measles cases in California has prompted readers to ask what Alameda Unified School District’s (AUSD) vaccination requirements are and how many families are opting out. State law requires children to be vaccinated against a list of diseases before entering school, but parents can obtain waivers if vaccinating their children would violate their personal beliefs.

 

Read the full story and more Alameda news at http://webh.it/alamedasun. 

 

The Asian Art Museum of San Francisco will present Yoga: The Art of Transformation on Wednesday, April 9, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Regina K. Stafford Meeting Room at the Main Library, 1550 Oak St. The program coincides with an exhibition of the same name at the Asian Art Museum.

The presentation explores yoga’s goals; its Hindu as well as Buddhist, Jain and Sufi manifestations; its means of transforming body and consciousness and its profound philosophical foundation.

This is a free program sponsored by the Friends of the Alameda Free Library.

 

Alameda residents John Cashman, Diane Runyan and Nita Greganti are once again joining the AIDS LifeCycle bicycle ride from San Francisco to Los Angeles travelling 545 miles to support the San Francisco AIDS Foundation (SFAF).

Cashman, owner of The Cashman Team Inc. Real Estate  Company, and one of the oldest on the ride has been riding for the SFAF since 1995 and will take his 12th ride this year.

The concept that particular foods promote healthier hearts is not new. It is a fact that a well-balanced nutritional diet contributes to good health throughout a lifetime. For many people, the risk of diseases such as Type II diabetes, high cholesterol, heart disease and coronary artery issues may be reduced by consuming healthy diets.

 

Most healthy Americans likely think malnutrition is something that only affects people in undeveloped countries. Recent studies indicate senior adults, especially those recovering from illness, are vulnerable to malnutrition.

According to National Pharmacies’ website, this includes as many as 50 percent of people aged 65 and older, especially those who are isolated. It’s also been reported by nutritional experts that there is a high likelihood that malnutrition is either not properly diagnosed in senior adults, or perhaps gets missed altogether.

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