Health Matters

Part B is medical insurance. It covers professional fees for doctors and other health-care providers, outpatient treatment, durable medical equipment, home health services, and preventive care like flu shots and screenings for cancer and heart disease.

Part B requires a monthly premium, which is $121.80 for most Americans in 2016. You’re not required to pay the premium if you don’t want Part B coverage. But is it to your advantage to pay?

The answer depends on your current and future health insurance coverage and needs.

Are you sick and tired of being sick and tired? Get outside with the Alameda Free Library’s Library Outside program. The typical day for an American adult is a whirlwind of tasks.
Breakfast, commute, work all day or evening, or night (if you’re lucky at only one job, but sometimes at two or three), commute, shopping, dinner, chores, prep for the next day, check emails, check social media, contact family and friends. 

It’s an unfortunate truth, but health care fraud drives up costs for everyone in the health care system. Fraud schemes often depend on identity thieves getting hold of people’s Medicare numbers. So guard your Medicare number. Treat it as you would a credit card. 
What can you do to protect yourself from health care fraud? 
n Don’t share your Medicare number or other personal information with anyone who contacts you by phone, email, or by approaching you in person. Medicare will never contact you and ask for your Medicare number or other personal information. 

When you get health care services, record the dates on a calendar and save the receipts and statements you get from providers to check for mistakes. Compare the dates and services on your calendar with the statements you get from Medicare to make sure you got each service listed and that all the details are correct. These include the "Medicare Summary Notice" (MSN) if you have Original Medicare, or similar statements that list the services you got or prescriptions you filled.

A breast cancer survivor’s search for best treatment

A newly released study provided good news for at least some breast cancer patients who dread the effects of chemotherapy treatment.

The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, concluded that a genetic test may be able to determine whether women with early stage breast cancer can skip chemotherapy and instead rely on hormone therapy.

Diana Warren, a breast cancer survivor, finds the study’s results heartening.

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