Health Matters

 

When I talk to people with Medicare about planning for the end of their lives, I ask where they’d rather die — in a hospital or at home. Seventy-five percent say at home and 25 percent say the hospital. But when you look at what actually happens, only 25 percent of people get to die at home, while 75 percent pass away in hospitals.

The only way you can ensure that your doctor understands your wishes is by talking about them. And now, Medicare will reimburse your doctor for that conversation.

 

A second community workshop with the title “Planning for a Healthy Economy in Alameda” has been set for Thursday, Dec. 8, at 6:30 p.m. in the Alameda High School Cafeteria at 2201 Encinal Ave. (The entrance to the cafeteria is near the intersection of Central Avenue and Walnut Street.)

The workshop will discuss the city’s Economic Development Strategic Plan that provides a roadmap for the city’s efforts on topics like job growth and retention, retail and restaurants, commercial development, tourism and other important issues. 

 

 

When someone with Medicare finds his or her way to my office phone, it’s often because of a complicated and snarly issue that’s going to take time to fix. However, it’s sometimes a Medicare beneficiary who found my number somewhere and called for some basic help in understanding their coverage. I love those calls because I have a quick and easy answer for folks like that. 

 

Medical Clown Project works to help patients heal with laughter

In the run up to Halloween, clowns have been scaring people but not all clowns are out for mischief. Alameda residents Jeffery Raz and Sherry Sherman are co-founders and part of a team of performers who bring clowning to a new level. 

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