Feature Articles

On Sunday, May 17, Alameda Support Foundation (ASF), together with the Friends of the Alameda Animal Shelter (FAAS), will be holding the first “Now That Your Lawn Is Gone” Garden Tour. The tour is an opportunity to visit more than 20 homes in Alameda that have removed their traditional front lawns in favor of more climate-friendly alternatives. These include vegetables, stone sculptures, and Mediterranean and native plants. 

There will also be a raffle and plant sale as part of the event. All proceeds from the event will go to supporting the animals at FAAS.

In ancient times, the Greeks praised mothers during the festival of Rhea. Rhea was the mother of their gods. 

The modern Mother’s Day was created 150 years ago by social activist Anna Jarvis. She called it “Mother’s Work Day.” In 1914, Woodrow Wilson signed a bill recognizing Mother’s Day as a national holiday.

The nation’s most talented craftspeople are chosen to display their works at the Smithsonian Craft Show at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C., April 22 through 26. The 121 craftspeople chosen to participate must show one-of-a-kind or limited-edition works. Among the displaying artists was Alamedan Christina Goodman.

Goodman’s jewelry was displayed along with hundreds of fine works of basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

About 500 people attended a ceremony aboard the USS Hornet that honored participants in the April 18, 1942, Doolittle Raid. Hornet trustee Bob Fish provided an overview of the daring raid.

Richard Nowatzki, a Hornet CV-8 crewman, who watched the B-25 aircraft take off from the flight deck provided an eyewitness account of the Doolittle Raiders aboard. He also accepted the medal awarded to USS Hornet officers and crew. He presented it to Hornet Museum CEO Scott Lindeman for permanent display at the museum.

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