Feature Articles

Bank of Marin has announced a fall charitable giving program to benefit nonprofit organizations based in Alameda. The program will award a total of $10,000 in grants, ranging between $500 and $2,500 to selected organizations.

The bank will choose the recipients based on how community members will be served, the geographic reach the funds have and how the grant will benefit Alameda. To be eligible for a grant, nonprofits must be 501(c)(3) organizations with their main offices located in the city of Alameda. Participants do not need to be Bank of Marin customers.

The Alameda Public Affairs Forum begins its fall program 7 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 19, in the Regina K. Stafford Community Meeting Room at the Main Library, 1550 Oak St. with "Songs of Protest."

Discussion will revolve around music and its role in political movements. Examples include "There Once Was a Union Maid," about labor, the anti-war song "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" and the civil-rights theme "We Shall Overcome."

Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) is soliciting applications for its Underground Utilities District nomination board. Members of this board — three members of the public and city staff— will have the responsibility for nominating a set of districts where AMP would place overhead utilities underground.
Applicants must be AMP customers. Once appointed by the City Council, board members will serve from three to six months until a technical advisory committee has accepted their recommendations.

Nine members of the Island City’s class of 2015 will find the cost of their education a little less burdensome, thanks to scholarships funded by fines from the members of the Rotary Club of Alameda. Earlier this year, the club awarded $24,000 in scholarships to Alameda’s best and brightest as part of the organization’s commitment to the Rotary motto, "Service above Self." Many Alameda-based nonprofits receive money from the Rotary’s community grants program, which is funded by beverage sales at Concerts at the Cove and the support of local business sponsors.

The Alameda Boys and Girls Club members recently got a lesson on how to treat toxic storm runoff and prevent it from polluting the bay. As a result, they built and planted a garden that would naturally assist in the removal of toxins in draining water. The club launched the "Bioremediation Garden and Community Clean-up Project" more than a year ago at the Alameda Island Watershed located on its premises.

Automobile fluids flowed into the garden during rains, seriously harming its plants and other living objects, because of the garden’s low-lying location.

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