Editorial

As a member of Harbor Bay Neighbors who are in opposition to moving the Harbor Bay Club from its the location its operated from for more than 35 years in order to build homes or a hotel, I frequently hear misconceptions, and untruths that have been accepted as fact. I’d like to take this opportunity to set the record straight.

1. Ron Cowan and Harbor Bay Isle Associates (HBIA) have given up on replacing the current club with houses.

Two pieces appeared side-by-side on the May 29 Alameda Sun opinion page. The first, a letter written by City Councilman Stewart Chen (“We all want what’s best for Alameda”) stated, “The City Council is responding to the community’s desire to develop Alameda Point and is trying to do it with the least number of new housing units possible.” 

The column next to Chen’s letter was a commentary from Eugenie Thomson, a licensed civil and traffic engineer and a long-time resident of Alameda (“City Must Follow Charter”).

Commuting into and from Alameda over the next decades is bound to take longer, and I think it is “by design” by many government agencies.

The Caltrans project main goal is to improve the 23rd and 29th avenue exits of Interstate 880. As the primary impact is to the Oakland neighborhoods, the project mostly concentrated on appeasing Oakland neighborhood needs. The Alameda County Transportation Commission’s hired a consultant for the five-year project.

On occasion, I hear comments from community members suggesting our school district mismanages its finances. Such comments pain me, because since I arrived in Alameda in 2009, we have worked diligently to tighten up our systems, trim excess funding, and make our financial workings ever more transparent to our public. Indeed, after working in five school districts over 22 years, I can honestly say AUSD is one of the most fiscally responsible — and financially transparent — school districts I have seen. 

The only alternative: Get voter approval to change it.

Over the past two years, the City Council has taken two defiant steps toward approving nearly 4,000 new residential units primarily in the West End. 
First, on the eve of Independence Day — July 3, 2012 — the council rezoned 17 parcels with an overall site inventory capacity of 2,525 residential multi-family units outside Alameda Point for the city’s 2007-2014 housing element cycle. 

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