Editorial

Every year in March, scientists, researchers and medical professionals from around the country meet at the Annual Review of Geriatric Medicine, hosted by Harvard Medical School. They share the latest guidelines and advancements in the specialized care of elderly patients.

The clinical team at Calyx Health — a doctor’s office exclusively for Medicare seniors — attends this conference each year with the intention of implementing these findings at its seniors-focused primary-care clinic in Alameda.  

 

Most people live very active lives, including work, taking care of children, providing transportation, attending meetings, housekeeping, helping friends and relatives, shopping, exercising, cooking, arranging for extracurricular activities and more. There is time on the phone and computer, the need to check mail and pay bills. Perhaps a haircut or manicure is required. People take time to play in, or attend, sporting events or socialize with friends and family. 

 

Enjoy a day of revelry in Downtown Alameda in celebration of St. Patrick’s Day on Sunday, March 17. Put on some green attire, gather some friends and prepare to embark on a cultural journey. In addition to the abundant plates of traditional corned beef and cabbage, diners will find culinary treats such as corned beef sliders, Reuben sandwiches, pints of Guinness and all-day drink specials.

Here are a couple of recommendations for celebrating Irish-American culture in Downtown Alameda:

 

As the April 9 special election is getting closer, it is becoming apparent that the Measure B campaign is employing underhanded practices of repeatedly spreading misleading, fear-based information and telling outright lies to further their cause. After doing extensive research, we would like to break these down for our fellow Alamedans.

 

Recent letters to the editor have raised questions about the Alameda Sun’s policies regarding the opinion page. The Sun recently edited a letter. The writer emailed the Sun demanding that we run her original letter unedited in its entirety along with a second letter she submitted. 

She told the Sun that if both letters didn’t run exactly the way she wrote them, she would report the paper to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for violating her rights. She followed her written demands with a phone call. 

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