Editorial

As the electoral campaign for the Alameda County Superintendent of Schools heats up, tough questions and critical analysis are expected. As decisions are made, it is crucial to remember the role of the superintendent as the countywide education leader. To be effective in this role, she must bring districts and independent schools together to share best practices, provide appropriate training for teachers and administrators, and ensure that every child is served to reach his or her full potential and has a clear understanding of various pathways to college and career.

Over the last few months, the community has received a number of communications from the Alameda Unified School District (AUDS) office about the Facilities Master Plan and the potential for putting a bond on the ballot this November. This project — the end goal of which is to provide safer, more comfortable, and up-to-date facilities for our students and staff — is now at a critical stage, so I wanted to let you know of our progress and encourage you to continue to get involved.

Good news for the people of Arkansas, Utah or Nevada maybe, but Californians?

I recently read in the press that out-of-staters are a big boost for the University of California’s (UC) system because higher enrollment means more cash. As environmentalists like to say, “Every cloud has a sulfur lining,” but even as a Pollyannaish Panglossian it is difficult to cipher any good news in the article. How are out-of-staters who bump California students out of UC seats, perceived as good news?

I shudder and shake my head in disbelief every time I drive by Buena Vista Avenue and Park Street and see the empty building on the intersection’s northeast corner. I remember the sudden rush to tear down the abandoned Queen Anne-style cottage that once stood at 2413 Buena Vista Ave. In its place stands a brand-new vacant building.

I remember the city looked the other way (at the beginning of its so-called Preservation Season) and allowed the Hoi Liang Phau Trust to demolish the cottage a little more than three years ago. 

Robert Sullwold’s incendiary criticism of city hall and the firefighters union IAFF Local 689 (“City Stuffs Stockings for AFD Firefighters,” March 27) showed dogged and detailed research. He is to be commended for bringing such numbers to light in the community interest.

As all professional firefighters know, the first thing one does when something is ablaze is to vent and let the smoke out and he does a fine job of this as well. The problem is that what all those numbers add up to, as far as his reasoning goes, amounts to mostly smoke.

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