Editorial

The Cub Scouts in Den 2 of Pack 2 had a busy weekend. On Saturday, Jan. 24 they met with Alameda Museum President Judith Lynch. She taught them all about Neptune Beach.

They also visited the world headquarters of the Alameda Sun newspaper, where owners Eric J. Kos and Dennis "the Menace" Evanosky explained how a weekly newspaper works.

The next day, they went to Kung Fu and visited the Hiller Aviation Museum.

The Cub Scouts in Den 2 want to thank Lynch, Kos and Evanosky. We learned a lot.

Alameda has a rental crisis — skyrocketing rents and frequent increases have renters reeling — especially renters with low and fixed incomes.

Alameda renters deserve fair treatment — and our community needs better ways to keep more people in their homes. Today, landlords can raise rents as high as they want without limits, displacing tenants.

As Plato is alleged to have said, "Those who would want to rule are unfit to rule." The corollary would read, "Those who would resist public office are possibly fit to rule."

Or as specifically spelled out in Plato’s Republic, "Can you name any other type or ideal of life that looks with scorn on political office except the life of true philosophers? What others then, will you compel to undertake the guardianship of the city?"

In Plato’s utopian and unrealized republic, philosophers govern the Arcadian city state.

I am the owner of the home at 1207 Union St. This property was brought to our attention by one of our agents who believed we could restore the property and bring it back to life.

I’ve always loved these older Victorian-era homes. While growing up I spent many days, nights and weekends in Alameda at my grandmother’s home. She still lives in that same house after 50 years, so I understand the importance of neighborhood community and culture.

Lately I’ve noticed a lot of letters trying to restrict the newly elected City Council’s choices regarding building agreements that were approved by the departing Council members. According to the majority of these letters repealing even part of the building agreements would send the wrong message to companies considering moving to Alameda, and as a result have long-term grave consequences for the business environment in Alameda.

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