Editorial

 

Did you know that the city of Alameda has a Public Art Fund with more than $200,000 to be disbursed?

Since a public art ordinance was adopted in 2003, the city has taken a measured, deliberate approach to disbursing public art funds. Sadly, the disbursement process is still not resolved. Over the past decade, numerous community meetings were held, staff reports prepared, a Public Arts Commission (PAC) was seated and a study was commissioned to assess the public art program and recommend development of arts and culture in Alameda. 

 

As the father of a Maya Lin School third-grader I have a keen interest in the passage of Measure B1 this November. Measure B1 is a renewal of an existing parcel tax that has already been approved by voters, but is set to expire soon. It accounts for 12 percent of the school district’s budget. 

 

I’ve never had any musical training; no third-grade flute lessons, no voice lessons, no teenage angst expressed through strumming on a starter guitar. For most of my life, I’ve been mostly overly self-conscious about my alto delivery in a sea of soprano renditions of “Happy Birthday” or common Christmas carols.

Did you know that the City of Alameda has a Public Art Fund with over $200,000 to be disbursed?

Since a public art ordinance was adopted in 2003, the City has taken a measured, deliberate approach to disbursing public art funds. Sadly, the disbursement process is still not resolved. Over the past decade, numerous community meetings were held, staff reports prepared, a Public Arts Commission (PAC) was seated, and a study was commissioned to assess the public art program and recommend development of arts and culture in Alameda. 

 

It’s always been about the animals. 

In 2011, when I began my service as a volunteer board member for Friends of the Alameda Animal Shelter (FAAS), our small nonprofit stepped forward to stop Alameda from closing our shelter and outsourcing a mandated city service to another municipality. We knew that if this happened stray animals would face certain death and that lost pets — our neighbors’ pets — would face greatly reduced odds of being reunited with their grieving owners. We couldn’t let that happen. Alameda deserved better. Our animals deserved better.

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