Editorial

I’m actually shocked that the relocation and rezoning requests from Harbor Bay Isle Associates (HBIA) are even a consideration. There are several reasons this proposed action cannot be approved:

 From the conception of Harbor Bay Isle, agreements with the city were made. These must be honored. Period. The agreement with the city states: "The purpose of the Harbor Bay Club is and shall continue to be to provide quality recreation facilities for the residents of the Harbor Bay Isle residential development."

I discovered, early on, the pain of being gay and alone, in a world that did not want me.

Fortunately, the metaphysical call within was strong and became fully engaged when my Lutheran confirmation class began at age 14. Reverend Stephan had no idea what he was in for when I began asking questions about the Bible and religious doctrine. The answers to those questions set a pattern of vagueness as to whether there was any truth at all within organized religion.

Alameda renters, take note. The economy is changing around you. It happened already in San Francisco. It’s happening in Oakland. 

Prices are going up. The prices already went up for water, milk, just about everything else. You’re not safe in your home.

What does tiny Alameda have in common with big cities like Los Angeles, Orlando, Seattle and San Antonio? They are all powered by community-owned electric utilities. In 1887, Alameda’s Board of Trustees (the predecessor to today’s City Council) voted to enter the power business. City leaders believed that, like public schools, parks, hospitals, police and fire departments, community-owned power addressed a basic community need: electricity as an essential public service. Even then, our little town was setting trends.

One of our mayors once said that raising a controversial issue in Alameda will almost assuredly start a discussion similar to a Holy War! I have lived on Bay Farm Island since 1980 and I can assure you that her statement is absolute fact.

The idea of progress in Alameda is often fought by a group of people who want Alameda to stay the same as it was in 1950. These people are often very strong and loud in their opinion, but certainly do not represent everyone. They will never represent me.

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