Alameda Student, Educator Among 2020 ‘Women Who Dare’ Awardees

Zohra Rahimi

Alameda Student, Educator Among 2020 ‘Women Who Dare’ Awardees

Alameda Student, Educator Among 2020 ‘Women Who Dare’ Awardees

Girls Inc. of the Island City (GIIC) has announced its 2020 Women Who Dare awardees. In order to be selected, the women and teens must “exemplify strong, smart and bold and provide powerful role models for girls.”

Among the five awardees are two notable for their work in Alameda.

Zohra Rahimi
A senior at Alameda Science and Technology Institute (ASTI), Zohra Rahimi is a passionate leader committed to ensuring that students have a voice in their schools and districts. She is the co-director of the Alameda Initiative, a high-school student-run organization that tutors elementary-school students. 

Her leadership activities include representing ASTI on the Alameda Unified School District (AUSD) Board of Education, executive vice president of ASTI’s PTSA and junior class president. Upon receiving her diploma, she will have transfer requirements for both the University of California and California State University systems and for an associate of arts degree in liberal arts with an emphasis on natural sciences. 

Rahimi has achieved highest honors for academic awards in biology, Spanish and debate, to name a few. Her career focus is on neuroscience and neuroplasticity but serving her community remains her highest priority.

Judith Goodwin
Judith Goodwin, an educator and principal, is celebrating her 33rd year in education. She taught for 13 years and has been a school administrator for AUSD for 20 years. Goodwin earned her bachelor’s in radio and television from Long Beach State, and her master’s in educational leadership from Cal State East Bay. The common thread for Goodwin has been strengthening communication among stakeholders to promote creativity and opportunity through learning together.

As an educator, her focus has been to provide students with the Four C’s: creativity, complexity, curiosity and collaboration. Goodwin and her staff at Maya Lin School serve this goal through arts-integration and inquiry-based instruction to develop the whole child. They work to provide students the tools necessary to navigate the world they will inherit in the not-too-distant future.

Other awardees

  • Betty Reid Soskin — Honorary award; park ranger, activist and storyteller. Soskin, 98, is America’s oldest active park ranger. She is also a long-time civil rights activist, composer, singer, entrepreneur, celebrated storyteller and proud mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. 
  • Lisa Curtis — CEO and founder, Kuli Kuli. Lisa founded Kuli Kuli after serving in the Peace Corps in Niger where she discovered the nutritional power of moringa. Kuli Kuli empowers African women and small moringa farmers around the world through the sales of their sustainably sourced moringa products. Prior to growing Kuli Kuli into a multimillion-dollar social enterprise, Lisa served as the communications director at Mosaic; wrote political briefings for President Barack Obama; and served as a United Nations Environment Programme Youth Advisor. 
  • Sophia Kofoed — A senior at Miramonte High School, Kofoed has always been passionate about helping others. In elementary school, she published Isabella Makes a Difference: How Kids Can Help the World Too, to raise funds for struggling public schools. 

Three years ago, Kofoed suffered a brain injury during a lacrosse game. After an arduous recovery, she became a powerful voice for equity and safety in girls’ sports. She co-founded the Brain Safety Alliance and began a grassroots campaign to mandate headgear in her league. 

The honorees will be celebrated at the 21st annual Women Who Dare evening gala on Saturday, Feb. 29, at the Oakland Scottish Rite Center, 1547 Lakeside Dr. For more information and to purchase tickets to the gala, see www.giicwomenwhodare.org.

For information about GIIC, call 521-1743 Ext. 207, or visit www.girlsincislandcity.org.

Judith Goodwin