Letters to the Editor

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Editor:

I read that my neighbors, friends, clients and people like me had to deal with insults while merely trying to ride a bus to work. I rode a bus, train and carpool to Cupertino 30 years ago. Then I became an inventor and co-founder of software startups as well as a surgical medical imaging startup.

Congratulations on landing a great job in a field with amazing innovation. Yours was not an overnight achievement. It’s literally the culmination of years of effort. 

Alameda seems like one of the best kept secrets in the Bay Area. We are fortunate to live in close proximity to one of the most dynamic areas on the planet during one of the most exciting periods the world has yet experienced. Finding new ways to enhance the power of individuals to improve the world for the benefit of as many as possible is not an easy task.

Your success serves to inspire people of all ages to participate in life-long learning so they, too, can come to enjoy pursuing their dreams. This is perhaps the most generous gift we can give.

We appreciate you taking personal responsibility to reduce your carbon footprint and reduce traffic, while participating as vital members in our community, supporting our schools and contributing your voice to public decision-making.

We are proud to have you as neighbors.
 

— Kirk Knight

Editor:

On Saturday, May 3, the Alameda Police Department will sponsor a “May you Arrive Safely” walk across Alameda to promote pedestrian safety for the entire family. The walk will start at 9 a.m. from each of Alameda’s ferry stops at Bay Farm and Alameda Point and finish at the police department behind City Hall by 12:30 p.m. 

Sign up online at www.eventbrite.com/o/alameda-police-department-6132421551?s=22507629.

The walk from the Alameda Point ferry will tour through the Jean Sweeney Open Space Park where the future Cross Alameda Bike and Walk Trail will be developed. This event is a great opportunity to participate in a day of fun, learn some safety points, and tour your future 22-acre park. The park design has been approved by the Recreation and Parks Commission and will go to City Council in May for final approval. The park will be a phased project with the Cross Alameda Bike and Walking trail to be one of the first features to be built.

Those who sign up early for the walk will receive a free T-shirt designed to promote roadway visibility. The shirt will be “traffic safety” green and have a reflective safety message on the back. See more at: alamedaca.gov/police/events/2285. 

Bring the family and friends for a walk across town with the extra treat of a tour through the future Jean Sweeney Open Space Park.
 

— Dorothy Freeman, Jean Sweeney Open Space Park Fund

Editor:

The pedestrian-safety campaign announced recently by Alameda’s Chief of Police Paul Rolleri is long overdue (“APD Starts Program to Protect Pedestrians,” March 7.)

I’ve had the pleasure, and run the risk, of walking the streets of our island almost daily for the past 27 years. During that time I’ve almost been hit, and twice seen others injured, by inattentive drivers dozens of times.  

Almost always the fault resides with the driver of the motor vehicle. Vehicles rolling through stop signs are a common risk for pedestrians.  Other motorists routinely fail to look for pedestrians at intersections, don’t pay attention to what’s going on around them, day dream, or are distracted by other persons, cell phones, texting, loud music, etc. I’ve even seen motorists reading books and documents while driving.

It goes without saying that pedestrians must walk defensively.  I do hope, however, that APD’s campaign makes many more drivers aware of the danger their inattention poses to Alamedans strolling our streets.

And while we’re at it, let’s crack down on bicyclists who fail to obey traffic laws or observe normal rules of the road. Many of them never stop or even slow down at intersections, making them as dangerous to pedestrians as motorists.
 

— Tom Tuttle

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