Letters to the Editor

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Editor:
Last Sunday, Jan. 20, my son, Joshua, and I discovered that Joshua’s birthday gift, an almost-new bicycle and accessories were stolen from the parking lot of the Harbor Bay Club (200 Packet Landing Road). 

Joshua, 11, attends Lincoln Middle School in the sixth grade, and is distraught. He feels guilty even though the crime committed against him is not his fault. He is particularly concerned as I was recently diagnosed with advanced stomach cancer last April. I have been undergoing treatments since, which has significantly impacted our finances. 

I am writing in case sharing his story results in a local bike shop or a kind fellow Alameda resident donating a replacement bike or accessories for Joshua. For now, he’ll ride my old bike, which doesn’t fit him properly, but is the best we can do. Our insurance deductible is more than the price of a new bike.

Thanks for your kind attention. If you can help, please write me at marisaajdel@yahoo.com.

 

Marisa Ajdelman

Editor:
I am proud of what our community is becoming. On Martin Luther King’s birthday, Rasheed Shabazz led an amazing rally, march and program celebrating one of our nation’s great heroes. He also educated his fellow Alamedans about a shameful name in Alameda’s past — Henry Haight — that needs to be toppled like a confederate statue. 

Also that weekend and the weekend following, Ruth Smiler continued leading her weekly Saturday noontime vigils on Park Street. These last two vigils, concurrent with Martin Luther King day and the Women’s March, outdid themselves in attendance and good feelings.

I applaud these Alameda leaders!

 

Dan Wood

Editor:
As a master’s degree student in the area of public administration with a bachelor of science in medicine, I am concerned about the mannerisms people use toward patients, the service given to them and the hygiene of where the patients get treated. 

Example: Regardless if an employee of a clinic, hospital or student finishing school it’s not anyone’s place to condescend about the care or people who treat a patient. Patients are ill or injured and the last thing on their minds is, “Does this clinic know what they are doing?”

Please, when someone sacrifices time to learn how to assist the sick, it’s their job to help in whatever area they attended school to help the patient. It sickens me when I hear, “Oh it’s not my job” or “What does that patient want?” 

Don’t forget we all have the same purpose in medicine, to treat and care for those that need us. One day we will be in the patient’s place so think before you act or speak. 

The other concern is, if one is employed for cleanliness, please clean the hospital. It helps prevent infection and rodents or other pests from coming in to harm the building or cause an inconvenience. Many think, “I have nothing to do,” but the bathroom is dirty, or the floor has not been cleaned.
When students go to medical school, they must remember the oath they agreed to upon accepting their degrees. The safety of the patient comes first.

Remember, we will all be patients one day. Think before you speak and be considerate. Remember, care for the patient as someone would care for youself if you were sick. Respect and treat patients with “AIDET” (acknowledge, introduce, duration, explanation and thank you).  

It is important to realize we get patients with many different thoughts. Don’t argue, or talk down to them, because one day that might be us and how would we feel in that situation? I went back to school to learn how to be an advocate for a patient — their voice, eyes and ears. It’s not about me or the paycheck, but the care and delivery. The money will come because the patient will see the quality the organization delivers. 

Also remember, leaders don’t seem to be in charge when they have to demean other organizations, short serve the patient or shirk cleanliness because, in the end, it causes shut downs and people wanting to go somewhere else for treatment because when one is sick one doesn’t have time for nonsense.

 

Bianca Estella Garcia

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