History of Alameda

A collection of articles on Alameda History by Dennis Evanosky and Eric J. Kos

 

Alameda Chamber of Commerce postcard of Neptune Beach

At 1223 Post St. in Alameda’s East End, a humble Gold Rush-era cottage still stands. It once housed a Norwegian immigrant named Christopher Christensen and his family. Post Street residents Farrah Morin, Safia Pigott and Abby Hayton celebrated the 168th anniversary of the discovery of gold on Jan. 24, 1848, on the steps of this Gold Rush-era cottage. That cottage inspired the Culinary Academy of Post Street to learn about the East End’s Gold Rush heritage. We also sampled Gold Rush grub including one special item first served in 1849 that you can still enjoy today!

Courteous. Warm. Kind. Respectful. 

These are the words Cheryl Kettell and Linda Benson used to describe the people they met in October at the Parliament of the World’s Religions in Salt Lake City. 

The staircase on the high-basement cottage at 2019 Pacific Avenue in Alameda draws the eye upward to the home’s full porch. A row of spindles complements the porch that sweeps across this Queen Anne-style home. Fish-scale shingles — like the spindles, signature Queen Anne elements — decorate the second-story dormer, which is built in the form of a pediment. A pair of windows on each side of the entry door adds symmetry to this home. The window in the dormer echoes the design of the windows below. 

On Friday, Falcon’s Court, a non-profit educational organization that presents living history programs at schools throughout California, brought the Renaissance to Wood Middle School to show the seventh graders what life was like in Western Europe from the 14th to the 17th centuries.  Students spent the morning meeting falconers, a minstrel, a country dance fiddler and a master swordsman. 

Pages