History of Alameda

A collection of articles on Alameda History by Dennis Evanosky and Eric J. Kos

 

Alameda Chamber of Commerce postcard of Neptune Beach

On Friday, Falcon’s Court, a non-profit educational organization that presents living history programs at schools throughout California, brought the Renaissance to Wood Middle School to show the seventh graders what life was like in Western Europe from the 14th to the 17th centuries.  Students spent the morning meeting falconers, a minstrel, a country dance fiddler and a master swordsman. 

Recently the news has been full of reports about terror and violence. The cause is often ethnic and religious differences. For a refreshing change of pace, here is some good news about our youth here in the East End of Alameda. 

The following Veterans Day reflections were written by Alamedan lrv Hamilton, on Nov. 03, 2003. He deeply believed and was most patriotic when it came to his thoughts about our soldiers and the great services they have provided to our country. He passed away last Memorial Day. 

The Quiet Heroes

The ferry Oakland waits for her passengers in a 1969 painting by Alameda painter L. E. Nelson. The painting hangs in the Alameda Museum today near the reception desk.

In the painting the Alameda Mole served Nelson as a backdrop. Looking at the history of both objects of Nelson’s interest brings something interesting to mind. Both the Alameda Mole and the side-wheeler Oakland fell victim to fire.

Nelson’s painting shows the 1902 Mole that replaced the one that burned that very same year. James Fair and Alfred Davis built the first Alameda Mole in 1884

Main Street. The words evoke a thoroughfare with shops, a park and maybe city hall or other municipal building. Alameda’s Main Street boasts no such amenities.

In fact, the Island City’s Main Street runs nowhere near the center of town but skirts its periphery. Alameda’s Main Street has something in common with another Main Street arcoss the bay.

San Francisco’s Main Street and Alameda’s Main Street both bear Charles Main’s name.

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