History of Alameda

A collection of articles on Alameda History by Dennis Evanosky and Eric J. Kos

 

Alameda Chamber of Commerce postcard of Neptune Beach

Chapin Street recalls Samuel Austin Chapin who owned a tract of land in Alameda that bore his family’s name. Early maps show the tract cheek-on-jowl with the Mastick Tract, which centered on the San Francisco and Alameda Railroad’s Mastick Station near today’s Lincoln Avenue and Constitution Way. Chapin lived in San Francisco for a time and trusted attorney Edwin Mastick with his legal affairs. When Chapin passed away in 1890, Mastick served as one of the will’s executors. 

At a screening of the documentary film Shallow Waters, The Public Death of Raymond Zack, last Sunday, Alamedans struggled with the import of a particularly unfortunate turn of events that resulted in the death of Alameda resident Raymond Zack in 2010. 

Zack succumbed to hypothermia after several hours in the bay waters off Shore Line Drive near Willow Street. First responders, limited by budget and training restrictions, damaged water-rescue equipment and convoluted communications did not act to bring Zack back to shore in time to save him. 

At 1223 Post St. in Alameda’s East End, a humble Gold Rush-era cottage still stands. It once housed a Norwegian immigrant named Christopher Christensen and his family. Post Street residents Farrah Morin, Safia Pigott and Abby Hayton celebrated the 168th anniversary of the discovery of gold on Jan. 24, 1848, on the steps of this Gold Rush-era cottage. That cottage inspired the Culinary Academy of Post Street to learn about the East End’s Gold Rush heritage. We also sampled Gold Rush grub including one special item first served in 1849 that you can still enjoy today!

Courteous. Warm. Kind. Respectful. 

These are the words Cheryl Kettell and Linda Benson used to describe the people they met in October at the Parliament of the World’s Religions in Salt Lake City. 

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