History of Alameda

A collection of articles on Alameda History by Dennis Evanosky and Eric J. Kos

 

Alameda Chamber of Commerce postcard of Neptune Beach

 

March 31, 1917 dawned a sunny, but frosty day in Alameda. Robert C. Strehlow and his partners August Freese and Pete Peterson weren’t worried though. They knew that the frost would dissipate and the sun would warm the day and attract visitors as the doors opened for the first time at Neptune Beach. The trio had waited for this day. They had gone to considerable expense to convert the long-closed Neptune Gardens to a more modern attraction. 

 

The 100th anniversary of the opening of Neptune Beach is fast approaching. Neptune Beach once occupied the shoreline along Central Avenue between today’s McKay Avenue and Page Street. The resort welcomed its first guests on March 31, 1917. 

 

Once a year, history buffs open the old Mint building at Fifth and Mission streets in San Francisco to the public for a weekend event called San Francisco History Days. The event pulls together historians and historical organizations from around the Bay to celebrate and share local history.

The event takes place Saturday and Sunday, March 4 and 5, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at 88 5th St. in San Francisco.

 

Since 1983, Martin Luther King Jr. Day (Jan. 16 this year) has been designated a day of service. Residents can get started early on Saturday, Jan. 14, from 9 a.m. to noon, when Alameda Point Partners and the city of Alameda Public Works Department host a shoreline cleanup event.

Volunteers are asked to wear sturdy, closed-toe shoes, and bring their own reusable buckets or bags and work gloves. Large groups are encouraged. Participants under the age of 18 are welcome, but must be accompanied by an adult.  

 

On Saturday, Jan. 7, 2017, Immanuel Lutheran Church on Lafayette Street will celebrate the 125th anniversary of the dedication of its church, the oldest sanctuary in Alameda. (Alameda has older congregations, but they worship in newer sanctuaries). Immanuel’s sanctuary on Lafayette Street is also the oldest Lutheran sanctuary on the West Coast.

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